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This subject might be already treated but I can't find solution to this problem. I declare a static const std::string[] member in a class like this:

The .h:

class MyClass
{
private:
    static const std::string cArray[aNumber];

    //other stuff like ctors & all
}

The .cpp

const std::string MyClass::cArray[] = {"", "ini", "txt", "bmp"};

This class is included in another header in wich I declare static const array[] of MyClass. The problem is: when these arrays are builded, m_cArray contains empty strings which I use to fix stuffs in other static array.

I saw some threads on static initialization order issue but I didn't found a helpful answer.

Suggestions are welcome. Thanks

share|improve this question
    
-1: This is a mess now. The answers have gone through several revisions as the question has completely changed. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 30 '13 at 13:32
    
I don't think so. I agree I've done some mistakes but the subject is clear. Furthermore, syam resolved my problem. –  Weldryn Aug 30 '13 at 14:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your problem seems indeed to stem from the infamous static initialization order fiasco.

Basically, when you have a static variable X in one translation unit, referring to another static variable Y in a second translation unit, then your program has 50/50 chances of misbehaving. In order to behave properly, Y should be initialized before X but C++ doesn't enforce that.

As far as I know, the only proper way to handle this is to use function-level static variables, which ensure that m_array will be initialized on first call of MyClass::array() (and in C++11 this initialization is even guaranteed to be thread-safe):

struct MyClass {
    static const size_t arraySize = 4;

    // This function could be defined in a .cpp rather than inline
    // I only put it inside the class for compactness/readability reasons
    static const std::string* array() {
        static const std::string m_array[arraySize] = {"", "ini", "txt", "bmp"};
        return m_array;
    }
};

// In some other file
struct OtherClass {
    // This function could be defined in a .cpp rather than inline
    static void whatever() {
        do_something_with(MyClass::array());
    }
};

In other words, you should avoid declaring static global or class variables (unless you are absolutely sure they can be resolved to compile-time constants, like arraySize above), but wrap them at function-level inside static functions.


As a side note, this idiom makes it much easier for you to use a proper container rather than a legacy C array, eg. std::vector or, if you are using C++11, std::array:

// C++03
struct MyClass {
    // This function could be defined in a .cpp rather than inline
    static const std::vector<std::string>& data() {
        static std::vector<std::string> m_data;
        if (m_data.empty()) {
            m_data.push_back("");
            m_data.push_back("ini");
            m_data.push_back("txt");
            m_data.push_back("bmp");
        }
        return m_data;
    }
};

// C++11
struct MyClass {
    using Container = std::vector<std::string>;
    // or
    // using Container = std::array<std::string, 4>;

    // This function could be defined in a .cpp rather than inline
    static const Container& data() {
        static const Container m_data = {"", "ini", "txt", "bmp"};
        return m_data;
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
I do understand what you mean but not the code you wrote (the first part, in any case). My compiler is VS2008 so I can't use array type. The second part is much comprehensible for me: you use a factory function if I'm not mistaken? –  Weldryn Aug 30 '13 at 13:24
    
@Weldryn I was using C++11 features, but I edited it when I saw you were using C++03 so you should be good to go now. As to the second part, that's not a factory function (factory means, create new objects each time), it's the "construct on first use" idiom that is enabled by function-level static variables. There is only one instance of m_data, just like in your original code, but it is initialized on the first call of the function so the fiasco you're victim of cannot happen. –  syam Aug 30 '13 at 13:27
    
Ok, I know what you mean! Problem solved! Thanks :) –  Weldryn Aug 30 '13 at 14:02

You forgot to specify that cArray belongs to the class MyClass during the definition of your static member :

const std::string MyClass::cArray[] = {"", "ini", "txt", "bmp"};
//                ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

EDIT:

Your problem seems to be that the order of initialization of static members is undefined in C++.

As it is said here, the the most elegant way around it is to wrap the initialization in a function :    

class MyClass
{
private:
    static std::string* Array()
    {
        static std::string cArray[aNumber] = {"", "ini", "txt", "bmp"};
        return cArray;
    }
};

And you access your array with:

MyClass::Array();

EDIT: You corrected this mistake in your example

Maybe your other mistake could be that you named your member cArray in the class declaration:

class MyClass
{
private:
    static const std::string cArray[aNumber];
    //                       ^^^^^^
};

and m_cArray in the member definition:

const std::string m_cArray[] = {"", "ini", "txt", "bmp"};
//                ^^^^^^^^

I corrected this error on my first sample of code.

share|improve this answer
    
Also, it's called cArray, not m_cArray. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 30 '13 at 12:28
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit Thanks for pointing this out. I didn't see this error because of my habit to name the member like that. –  Pierre Fourgeaud Aug 30 '13 at 12:29
    
Post edited. The name was generalized for the forum –  Weldryn Aug 30 '13 at 12:33
    
@Weldryn I also edited my post :) –  Pierre Fourgeaud Aug 30 '13 at 12:34
    
Anyway, apart from the mistake due to my chronic alcoholism, the problem remains :). When I use some methods which use cArray in following header, I get empty strings in place of initial content :/ –  Weldryn Aug 30 '13 at 13:03

You need to say which class cArray is a member of when you initialise it

const std::string MyClass::cArray[] = {"", "ini", "txt", "bmp"};
share|improve this answer
    
Post edited, sorry I forgot it. –  Weldryn Aug 30 '13 at 12:32
    
Thanks, I'd just updated my answer covering that typo. Answer now updated again :) –  simonc Aug 30 '13 at 12:36

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