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After researching a way to exit a nested loop, I decided to try using goto,

private void example()
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
    {
        for (int ii = 0; ii < 100; ii++)
        {
            for (int iii = 0; iii < 100; iii++)
            {
                goto exitMethod;
            }                
        }             
    }

exitMethod:
}

But for some reason, if I put a goto label is at the very end of the method, Visual Studio 2012 (Ultimate) complains (and it won't compile),

Screenshot

But if I change my code to this,

private void example()
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
    {
        for (int ii = 0; ii < 100; ii++)
        {
            for (int iii = 0; iii < 100; iii++)
            {
                goto exitMethod;
            }                
        }             
    }

exitMethod:

    int someUnneededVariable; // Just an example, if I add ANY piece of code the error goes.
}

All the errors go (and it compiles); I've searched through all the MSDN references that I know of, and I couldn't find anything about this; is this a bug with VS 2012?

I know that I could easily solve this problem by using return;; even so, I would still like to find out what's causing this error.

share|improve this question
4  
Don't use goto. –  Sam Leach Aug 30 '13 at 14:26
    
I know; but it's the principle, from my understanding this should compile, but it doesn't. –  Sam Aug 30 '13 at 14:27
1  
@Sam: Nope, it really shouldn't :) –  Jon Skeet Aug 30 '13 at 14:31
    
you should write some code after label. Or atlease ';' After label so that visual studio can understand that there is not more code after this. –  Tushar Chhabhaiya Aug 30 '13 at 14:31
2  
At least you survived the raptor attack! –  Forty-Two Aug 30 '13 at 14:34

6 Answers 6

up vote 13 down vote accepted

A label doesn't exist on its own: it labels a statement. From section 8.4 of the C# 5 spec:

A labeled-statement permits a statement to be prefixed by a label. Labeled statements are permitted in blocks, but are not permitted as embedded statements.

In this case, you're applying the label at the end of the method - there's no statement for it to be a label for. So the compiler is absolutely right to reject your code.

If you really wanted to, you could add a label to an otherwise-redundant return statement:

exitMethod:
    return;
}

... or just an empty statement, as suggested by Irfan. There has to be a statement though.

But I wouldn't recommend it. Just change any goto exitMethod; statement to simply return.

share|improve this answer

You can place blank statement.

Try:

exitMethod: ;            

But anyways, if you really want to return from current method, use return statement. if method has other return type than void,

return (type);

otherwise

return;
share|improve this answer

In this case

goto exitMethod;

is equivalent to just plain

return;

and that plan return is significantly more readable. So I don't see why would you want to do that.

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Two things, first goto is NOT recommended. It will not allow you to use a label like that because of how labels work. A label is a source code only identifier allowing you to point to a specific instruction. In the case you're attempting, there is no instruction following it, and thus it cannot resolve to the location of an instruction. This is causing your error.

Again, you shouldn't be using a goto in this way. If you simply need to exit the function, you can use a return; statement. If the coding standard you're using dictate only a single return point, then try something like this:

private void example()
{
    bool escaping = false;
    for (int i = 0; i < 100 && !escaping; i++)
    {
        for (int ii = 0; ii < 100 && !escaping; ii++)
        {
            for (int iii = 0; iii < 100 && !escaping; iii++)
            {
                escaping = true;
                break; // this is only needed if there is code farther down this 
                       // inner loop that would otherwise be executed.
            }                
        }             
    }

return;
}
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"The goto statement transfers the program control directly to a labeled statement." 

You have exitMethod as your label, but in your first example you have no statement. This is why you are getting an error.

goto reference

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You need something for the goto to do. It cannot be blank.

For example:

private void example()
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
    {
        for (int ii = 0; ii < 100; ii++)
        {
            for (int iii = 0; iii < 100; iii++)
            {
                goto exitMethod;
            }                
        }             
    }

exitMethod:
    int i = DoSomething();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Well, technically he is correct. The last instruction in the method is some kind of "return" instruction and there is no reason not to put a goto label before it. But why. –  MK. Aug 30 '13 at 14:30

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