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What I have tried so far: http://cssdesk.com/zhc9c

HTML:

<div class="container">
    <h1>FIRST</h1>
    <span class="second">This is second text</span>

    <span class="third">Third text</span>
</div>

CSS:

.container {
    padding-bottom:10px;
    border-bottom:1px solid;
    position:relative;
}

h1 {
    display:inline;
    margin:0;padding:0;
}

.second {
    margin-left:10px;
}

.third {
    position:absolute;
    right:0;bottom:10px;
}

The problems:

  1. The third text doesn't seem to be aligned on the same base line with the others.
  2. Because of I'm using absolute position that sets the bottom property (of the third text), it means if I change the bottom padding of the container, I need to set this property too. Is it possible to make it "automatically" adjusted?
share|improve this question
    
Please post your code here. –  j08691 Aug 30 '13 at 16:30
    
Ok, code added. –  xdim222 Aug 31 '13 at 1:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Am I allowed to add extra markup? If so, using inline-block along with vertical-align is one possible solution:

<div class="container">
  <div>
    <h1>FIRST</h1>
    <span class="second">This is second text</span>
  </div><div>
    <span class="third">Third text</span>
  </div>
</div>

Notice there's no whitespace between the two div elements. This is because inline-block is affected by whitespace.

.container {
    padding-bottom:10px;
    border-bottom:1px solid;
}
.container * {
  display: inline-block;
  vertical-align: bottom;
}
.container div {
  width: 75%;
  text-align: left;
}
.container div + div {
  width: 25%;
  text-align: right;
}
h1 {
    display:inline;
    margin:0;padding:0;
}
.second {
  margin-left: 10px;
}

See http://cssdesk.com/pghv7

share|improve this answer
    
This looks good but can you please explain what "div + div" does in css? –  srijan Aug 30 '13 at 16:43
    
It's the Adjacent Sibling Selector. In this case it selects a div that immediately follows a div (<div></div><div>it selects this one</div>). Another example might be h1 + .second which would select .second but only if it immediately follows an h1. See developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/CSS/… –  Olly Hodgson Aug 30 '13 at 16:45
    
Thanks. This is new to me. Question: On the mozilla reference there is an example li + li { color: red; } Which changes the color of last two li's. Shouldn't it have changed the color of first two li's? –  srijan Aug 30 '13 at 16:49
1  
In that example, if you had <ul><li>First one</li><li>Second one</li><li>Third one</li></ul>, the second and third li elements would be color: red; because they immediately follow an li element. The first one follows a <ul>, so it would not be red. –  Olly Hodgson Aug 30 '13 at 16:51
1  
That make sense. Thanks a lot. –  srijan Aug 30 '13 at 16:51

It can't be done without removing position:absolute. Using Absolute positioning takes the element out of the normal flow, so you'll need manual positioning.

share|improve this answer
    
If you have any solution without position:absolute, that's fine for me. –  xdim222 Aug 31 '13 at 1:24
1  
Olly's answer is perfect! Use that. Use display:inline-block –  Kumar Harsh Aug 31 '13 at 6:35
.third {
    position:absolute;
    right:0;
    top:0;
    height:20px;
    bottom:0;
    margin:auto;
}

You can use this. It is setting the text at the approx position.

share|improve this answer
    
How do I know the height? if I change the font-size of h1, do I need to change the height too? –  xdim222 Aug 31 '13 at 1:26
    
If you are using h1 tag then there is no need of height property cssdesk.com/wJdt6 but if you are using span then you should give height. –  Muhammad Talha Akbar Aug 31 '13 at 4:13

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