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How do I make an array that's defined with a start point, an end point, and a total array size? Something like an array that goes from 1 to 10 that's 20 elements long. For example, the array could look something like:

1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 ...
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In the sample vector you give, moving from 1 to 10 in steps of 0.5 would give you a 19 element vector, not 20. –  gnovice Dec 6 '09 at 3:17
    
19 or 21? Fence-post problem! –  Zaid Dec 6 '09 at 9:41
    
19 - I counted on my fingers. Couldn't find my abacus. –  Doresoom Dec 7 '09 at 14:46
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There are a couple of ways you can do this:

  • Using the colon operator:

    startValue = 1;
    endValue = 10;
    nElements = 20;
    stepSize = (endValue-startValue)/(nElements-1);
    A = startValue:stepSize:endValue;
    
  • Using the LINSPACE function (as suggested by Amro):

    startValue = 1;
    endValue = 10;
    nElements = 20;
    A = linspace(startValue,endValue,nElements);
    

Keep in mind that the number of elements in the resulting arrays includes the end points. In the above examples, the difference between array element values will be 9/19, or a little less than 0.5 (unlike the sample array in the question).

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linspace generates linearly spaced vectors:

>>  A = linspace(1, 10, 20-1)
ans =
1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 ... 9.5 10
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n.b. linspace outputs row vectors; here in optimization land, all vectors are column vectors. beware. –  shabbychef Dec 8 '09 at 22:59
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the OP want to create an array with 20 elements and you're talking about some negligible optimization (which may not even be the case!!) –  Amro Dec 9 '09 at 3:54
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Simple one-liner!

1:0.5:10;

Output:

1 1.5 2 2.5 ... 9 9.5 10

Note that this would be a 19-element vector, not 20.

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No, this would be a 19-element vector. It would include the integers 1 to 10 (of which there are 10), along with the midpoints between each pair of integers (of which there are 9). –  gnovice Dec 6 '09 at 18:24
    
@gnovice: Thanks for the heads up. –  Zaid Dec 7 '09 at 9:28
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