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In my end to end tests, I want to drop the "test" database, and then create a new test db. Dropping an entire database is simple:

mongoose.connection.db.command( {dropDatabase:1}, function(err, result) {
    console.log(err);
    console.log(result);
});

But now how do I now create the test db? I can't find a createDatabase or useDatabase command in the docs. Do I have to disconnect and reconnnect, or is there a proper command? It would be bizarre if the only way to create a db was as a side effect of connecting to a server.

update

I found some C# code that appears to create a database, and it looks like it connects, drops the database, connects again (without disconnecting?) and that creates the new db. This is what I will do for now.

    public static MongoDatabase CreateDatabase()
    {
        return GetDatabase(true);
    }

    public static MongoDatabase OpenDatabase()
    {
        return GetDatabase(false);
    }

    private static MongoDatabase GetDatabase(bool clear)
    {
        var connectionString = ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["MongoDB"].ConnectionString;
        var databaseName = GetDatabaseName(connectionString);
        var server = new MongoClient(connectionString).GetServer();
        if (clear)
            server.DropDatabase(databaseName);
        return server.GetDatabase(databaseName);
    }
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

mongodb will create (or recreate) it automatically the next time a document is saved to a collection in that database. You shouldn't need any special code and I think you don't need to reconnect either, just save a document in your tests and you should be good to go. FYI this same pattern applies to mongodb collections - they are implicit create on write.

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