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I know I have done this a few times before but for the life of me can't remember how. I have a database I have created and I want to make a software that only inputs information into the database. The program works but my sql connection is the problem. So to test it out I basically tried to do it direct inserting hard-coded info but it still will not go. where am I going wrong?:

    using System;
    using System.Collections.Generic;
    using System.ComponentModel;
    using System.Data;
    using System.Drawing;
    using System.Linq;
    using System.Text;
    using System.Windows.Forms;
    using System.Data.Common;
    using System.Data.SqlClient;
    using System.Data.Sql;

    namespace InventoryTracker
    {
        public partial class Form1 : Form
        {
          public Form1()
            {
                InitializeComponent();
            }


            public static void CreateCommand()
            {
                SqlConnection myConnection = new SqlConnection("User Id=Jab" + "password=''" + "Data Source=localhost;" + "Trusted_Connection=yes;" + "database=InventoryTracker;" + "Table=Inventory;");

                try
                {
                    myConnection.Open();
                }
                catch (Exception e)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(e.ToString());
                }
                SqlCommand myCommand = new SqlCommand("INSERT INTO Inventory (ItemName, SerialNumber, Model, Department, Quantity, Notes) " + "Values (string,string,string,string, 1, string)", myConnection);

            }
    }
}

Thank you in advance! :-)

share|improve this question
    
What error are you getting? – Erik A. Brandstadmoen Aug 30 '13 at 19:06
1  
Where do you execute the query? – Sriram Sakthivel Aug 30 '13 at 19:06
    
You don't need to use + in your connection string. And, nobody can know right connection string except you. – Soner Gönül Aug 30 '13 at 19:07
    
Here is a sample to go msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… – Sriram Sakthivel Aug 30 '13 at 19:09
    
I don't think you need username and password in the connection string if you say it's a trusted connection... trusted connection is telling SQL to use windows authentication. Username and password tells it to use SQL authentication. – Paul D'Ambra Aug 30 '13 at 19:13

Your sql connection string is messed up, you need semi-colons between all parameters and your parameters are messed up too. I.e., something like

"Server=localhost;Database=InventoryTracker;Trusted_Connection=True;"

You are mixing trusted mode and specifying the user id -- trusted connection means to use your windows login credentials.

TableName does not go in the connection string.

This site is great for connection string examples http://www.connectionstrings.com/sql-server-2008

You SQL command, "INSERT INTO Inventory (ItemName ..." is pretty messed up too. Should be something like

INSERT INTO Inventory (ItemName ...) values(@ItemName ...)

You then pass in the values like

myCommand.Parameters.Add("ItemName", SqlType.VarChar).Value = "Dozen Eggs";

See Insert data into SQL Server from C# code for a simple example

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you all. All replies helped – Jay_the_noob Sep 5 '13 at 13:11

Just use the SqlConnectionStringBuilder class.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.data.sqlclient.sqlconnectionstringbuilder.aspx

Instead of:

"User Id=Jab" + "password=''" + "Data Source=localhost;" + "Trusted_Connection=yes;" + "database=InventoryTracker;" + "Table=Inventory;");

Try:

SqlConnectionStringBuilder builder = new SqlConnectionStringBuilder();
builder.UserID = "Jab";
builder.Password = "";
builder.DataSource = "localhost";
builder.InitialCatalog = "InventoryTracker";
share|improve this answer
1  
I've never used SqlConnectionStringBuilder. My connection strings have always been in a configuration file so that it is not compiled into the app. But a potentially useful alternative I've never notice before. +1 – Gary Walker Aug 30 '13 at 19:46
// Don't put table name in your connection string
    string connection_str = "Data Source = localhost ; uid = db_user; pwd = db_pass; database = db_name; ";
     conn = new SqlConnection(connection_str);
     conn.Open();
share|improve this answer

Try changing

"User Id=Jab" + "password=''" + "Data Source=localhost;" + "Trusted_Connection=yes;" + "database=InventoryTracker;" + "Table=Inventory;"

to

"User Id=Jab; " + "Password=''; " + "Data Source=localhost; " + "Trusted_Connection=yes; " + "Initial Catalog=InventoryTracker;"

(Changed upper/lower case, "Database" to "Initial Catalog", removed "Table" and added ";")


Also, you might want to try replacing "Data Source" by "Server".

share|improve this answer
    
Data Source and Server are synonyms. Database and Initial Catalog are synonyms. Connection string is not case sensitive though password, etc. in the string are case sensitive. – Gary Walker Aug 30 '13 at 19:42

Don't forget to call myCommand.ExecuteNonQuery to get it to actually execute your query. Without this, you are just creating a command, but not running it.

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