Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So we all know that 'this' is a tricky keyword in JavaScript, and anonymous functions and AngularJS promises make it even trickier.

QUESTION (TL&DR Version)

What is the right (and angular) way to allow promise callbacks to use the same "this" as the service that initiated the request?

See this fiddle for an example:

http://jsfiddle.net/tpeiffer/CFD3e/

All of these methods on the controller calls off to the Tier1Service. Tier1Service then calls off to the WorkerService to get data. When the data is loaded, it returns said data via a promise to the Tier1Service. The data returned gets set into the Tier1Service_data property.

Alternate 3 is clean and it works, but it feels like there has to be a better way.

Alternate 4 is also very clean and it works, but again it seems wrong.

Now what I would REALLY like is for $q's promise to do all of this for me. :)

Here is the relevant code:

// App.js
    angular.constructor.prototype.call = function (scope, func) {
        return function () {
            func.apply(scope, arguments);
        };
    };

// Tier1Service
        get coolData() {
            return this._data;
        },
        set coolData(val) {
            this._data = val;
        },
        doWorkAlt1: function () {
            mySubWorkerService.someData.then(function (data) {
                // FAILS because 'this' is the window, 
                // not the service
                if (data) this._data = data;
            });
        },
        doWorkAlt2: function () {
            mySubWorkerService.someData.then((function (data) {
                // FAILS because data is undefined because
                // the function is wrapped in an anonymous
                // function
                if (data) this._data = data;
            }).call(this));
        },
        doWorkAlt3: function () {
            // WORKS because I keep track of the instance
            var instance = this;
            mySubWorkerService.someData.then(function (data) {
                if (data) instance._data = data;
            });
        },
        doWorkAlt4: function () {
            // WORKS because I keep pass 'this' around
            mySubWorkerService.someData.then(angular.call(this, function (data) {
                if (data) this._data = data;
            }));
        }

// WorkerService
        get someData() {
            var deferred = $q.defer();
            deferred.resolve('i got back data!!');
            return deferred.promise;
        }
share|improve this question
    
what is your question? –  zsong Sep 1 '13 at 7:05
    
Hmm, I thought this post was well worded and thought out, but I suppose I was long winded. I will update the post to better spell it out. –  Thad Peiffer Sep 2 '13 at 13:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should be able to use Function.bind to achieve the result you want:

doWork: function () {        
    mySubWorkerService.someData.then((function(data) {
        //this now refers to whatever it referred to in the doWork function
    }).bind(this));
}

Do note however that bind is not available in older browsers. However it's very easy to patch it in to the prototype manually if necessary.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, @Jani! That was the missing link! I was not aware of Function.bind. We are only focusing our product on tablets with very modern browsers, so ECMAScript 5 features are perfectly acceptable! Goes to show this old dog can still learn new tricks! –  Thad Peiffer Sep 3 '13 at 11:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.