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is that most optimal for server (speed) conversion of data ?

Could I change it for better performance ?

This is used in packet parser to set/get packet data.

void Packet::setChar(char val, unsigned int offset)
{
    raw[offset + 8] = val;
}

short Packet::getChar(unsigned int offset)
{
    return raw[offset + 8];
}

void Packet::setShort(short val, unsigned int offset)
{
    raw[offset + 8] = val & 0xff;
    raw[offset + 9] = (val >> 8)  & 0xff;
}

short Packet::getShort(unsigned int offset)
{
    return (short)((raw[offset + 9]&0xff) << 8) | (raw[offset + 8]&0xff);
}

void Packet::setInt(int val, unsigned int offset)
{
    raw[offset + 8] = val & 0xff;
    raw[offset + 9] = (val >> 8)  & 0xff;
    raw[offset + 10] = (val >> 16) & 0xff;
    raw[offset + 11] = (val >> 24) & 0xff;
}

int Packet::getInt(unsigned int offset)
{
    return (int)((raw[offset + 11]&0xff) << 24) | ((raw[offset + 10]&0xff) << 16) | ((raw[offset + 9]&0xff) << 8) | (raw[offset + 8]&0xff);
}

Class defs :

class Packet
{
    public:
        Packet(unsigned int length);
        Packet(char * raw);
        ///header

        void setChar(char val, unsigned int offset);
        short getChar(unsigned int offset);

        void setShort(short val, unsigned int offset);
        short getShort(unsigned int offset);

        void setInt(int val, unsigned int offset);
        int getInt(unsigned int offset);

        void setLong(long long val, unsigned int offset);
        long getLong(unsigned int offset);

        char * getRaw();

        ~Packet();
    protected:
    private:
        char * raw;
};

@EDIT added class definitions Char raw is inirialized with packet (new char).

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3  
Do you have evidence that this code is a performance bottleneck? If not, why change it? This cleanly and clearly expresses your intent. If you obfuscate it, you'll make the code harder to understand, harder to maintain, you'll make other code harder to debug, and you may even find that performance is worse on other CPUs and compilers. Leave it alone. –  David Schwartz Aug 30 '13 at 19:34
    
You seem to have left out the class definition (or the relevant subset of it that's needed to answer this question). raw is presumably an array of unsigned char or thereabouts. The repeated 8 (and related values like 9, 10, 11) are mysterious at some levels. You've not shown code that indicates how to know whether there's a byte, a short or an int in the packet. You've also not named things to allow for 'int is not always 32 bits long'. Please check up on how to create an SSCCE (Short, Self-Contained, Correct Example). –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 30 '13 at 19:35
    
@JonathanLeffler added class defs. +8 values are to cut out packet header what size is 8. –  Kacper Fałat Aug 30 '13 at 19:39
    
Thanks. On the whole, I agree with David Schwartz's assessment. What you've written is clear and portable. It packages the number in little-endian format — that's a legitimate design decision though network order is big-endian. Unless you've got a bottleneck in this code, don't mess with what's clean and working. Ideally, you should have a value such as enum { HEADER_SIZE = 8 }; and then use that in place of 8; I'd go so far as to use raw[offset + HEADER_SIZE + 0] = (val >> 0) & 0xff; raw[offset + HEADER_SIZE + 1] = (val >> 8) & 0xff; ... to emphasize the similarity in the code. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 30 '13 at 19:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I do agree with the comments saying "if it's not shown to be a problem, don't change it".

If your hardware is little endian, AND you either know that the offset is always aligned, or the processor supports unaligned accesses (e.g. x86), then you could speed up the setting of the larger data types by simply storing the whole item in one move (and yes, there will probably be people saying "it's undefined" - and it may well be undefined, but I've yet to see a compiler that doesn't do this correctly, because it's a fairly common thing to do in various types of code).

So something like this:

void Packet::setInt(int val, unsigned int offset)
{
    int *ptr = static_cast<int*>(&raw[offset + 8]); 
    *ptr = val;
}

void Packet::getInt(int val, unsigned int offset)
{
    int *ptr = static_cast<int*>(&raw[offset + 8]); 
    return *ptr;
}

Another thing I would DEFINITELY do is to ensure that the functions are present in a headerfile, so that the compiler has the choice to inline the functions. This will quite likely give you MORE benefit than fiddling with the code inside the functions, because the overhead of calling a function vs. being able to use the function inline will be quite noticeable. So that would be my first step - assuming you think it is a problem in the first place. For most things, stuffing the data into the buffer is not the "slow part" of sending a data packet - it is either the forming of the content, or the bytes passing down the wire to the other machine (which of the two depends on how fast your line is, and what calculations go into preparing the data in the first place).

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Nothing requires the compiler to implement this as one move and nothing prevents the compiler from implementing his existing code as one move. This is more likely to produce unaligned accesses, so it might even be significantly slower than his existing code. Worse, this code has numerous caveats that his existing code doesn't. (Relies on the byte order, relies on particular behavior on unaligned accesses, and so on.) This code is also harder to understand than his existing code. –  David Schwartz Sep 2 '13 at 14:33
    
@DavidSchwartz: Like I said in the first sentence, it's probably not a good idea to implement the code I posted. But nobody has posted any suggestion like this, which CAN in some cases improve things [particularly if the compiler doesn't realise what you want to do - which can happen at times]. –  Mats Petersson Sep 2 '13 at 14:37

It looks like that your implementation is already almost as efficient as possible. It simply isn't possible to optimize it further without a major overhaul of the application and even then, you'll save only few CPU cycles.

By the way, make sure that the function definitions are present in the header file, or #included to it. Otherwise, each output operation will need a function call, which is quite expensive for what you're doing.

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