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Here is my 1st file :

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){

printf("\n\nJe suis dans le fils\n\n");

execl("/exec","ii",NULL);

printf("\n\nJe suis revenu dans le fils\n\n");
}

And here is the exec file :

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){

printf("\n\n\n\nJe suis dans le exec\n\n\n\n");
printf("\n\n argc = %d \n\n argv[0] = %s \n\n argv[1] = %s",argc,argv[0],argv[1]);

}

The problem :

I'm blocked in the exec file, so the printf after my execl, in the 1s file, doesn't show :/ And also when I do the printf of argv[0] normally it should show me the file path but here it shows me "ii"

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Welcome to Stack Overflow. Please read the About page soon. Note that your execl (a) executes a program in the root directory, which you should never do (don't work in the root directory, which only root should be able to write to, and do not practice programming as root unless you really like restoring from backups and have good backups to restore from), and (b) passes it just one argument, "ii", which will be given as argv[0] to the executed program. Maybe you want execl("/exec", "/exec", "ii", (char *)NULL); passing two arguments to your program. exec is a shell built-in too. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 30 '13 at 20:05
    
Very tempted to edit the title and remove the reference to "fork", but instead I'll simply ask: where is the fork? There is no fork implied by execl, and perhaps this is the source of your confusion. If you want to fork, you must do so explicitly. –  William Pursell Aug 31 '13 at 0:02
    
OT: It should be: execl("/exec", "ii", (char *) NULL); –  alk Aug 31 '13 at 8:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm block in the exec file, so the printf after my execl, in the 1s file, doesn't show

That's right, execl doesn't return (unless there's an error). Once you exec there's no going back: in effect your process turns itself into another one, executing a different program.

when I do the printf of argv[0] normally it should show me the file path but here it shows me "ii"

Well as you figured out argv[0] shouldn't be taken for granted. The parent process can specify whatever it wants in it (even omit it). In your case you specify argv[0] for the child as ii. If you want to set it correctly (whatever that may be), add a second "/exec".


Side note: if you want an easy way to execute something, you might want to look into the standard system(3) and popen(3) functions.

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ok so if the execl() doesn't returns to the parent, do you know wich exec() function returns to the parents ? –  D3fman Aug 30 '13 at 19:44
2  
@shubha No exec function returns to the parent. –  cnicutar Aug 30 '13 at 19:44
1  
@R.. I think you are over-reacting. There are reasons to be cautious about how you use system() or popen(), but there are reasons to be cautious with most POSIX functions, and the system() and popen() functions used carefully are safe enough. And suggesting posix_spawn() is not kind; that is a most horribly complicated function to use — even worse than scanf(). –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 30 '13 at 20:10
1  
@JonathanLeffler: system is not thread-safe, and modifies global process state in a way that interferes with signal handling. I think this is reason enough to say it should never be used. –  R.. Aug 30 '13 at 20:52
1  
No; it is reason enough to say that 'if you are using threads, you should probably avoid system()' The POSIX specification for system() specifies that it need not be thread-safe, and also specifies that it dinks with SIGINT, SIGQUIT and SIGCHLD signals. Clearly, if that's a problem to your code, you should not use it. Interestingly, popen() has none of those caveats. It is important to know the specification of what you're using. It is not always wrong to use it — most of my programs are still single-threaded. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 30 '13 at 21:03

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