Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's say a class Member where member has an Id of type String. I want to know if there might be any problem with using a String equals() implementation inside another implementation. Would it be any better if the field Id was of type Long.

@Override public boolean equals(Object object){
  if(object == null) return false;
    if(! (object instanceof Member)) return false;
    Member member= (Member) object;
    if(this.Id.equals(member.Id))  //<==My concern is here
        return true; 
    else 
        return false;
}
share|improve this question
2  
Why do you think it would be any problem? Did you face one while running it? –  Rohit Jain Aug 30 '13 at 20:11
5  
You should be fine as long as this.Id is never null. By convention, though, it should be "id", not "Id". –  Eric Stein Aug 30 '13 at 20:11
    
You should use Objects.equals(Id, member.Id). Other than that it's fine. –  nosid Aug 30 '13 at 20:13
    
@EricStein Sounds like a fully sufficient answer to me –  Cruncher Aug 30 '13 at 20:13
1  
@user976095. NullPointerException. –  Rohit Jain Aug 30 '13 at 20:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The only problem I see is that you may have more class members besides id and your equals implementation will say true even while two instances differ greatly but have the same id. With this in mind, make sure to have a consistent hashCode implementation alongside to avoid inconsistencies.

Another idea is to define custom comparators e.g.

static Comparator<Member> MEMBER_ID_COMPARATOR = new Comparator<Member>() {
    @Override
    public int compare(Member first, Member second) {
       assert(first.getId() != null);
       assert(second.getId() != null);
       return first.getId().compareTo(second.getId());
    }   
}
share|improve this answer

No problem at all. From this point of view, leave Id as a String. If it's only going to contain numbers, yes, you can use Long or BigInteger (my preference). But this is a different animal whatsoever.

share|improve this answer

Try this instead

@Override public boolean equals(Object object){
  if(object == null) return false;
  if(! (object instanceof Member)) return false;
  Member member= (Member) object;
  if (this.Id == null && member.Id == null)
      return true;
  else if (this.Id != null && member.Id != null)
      return this.Id.equals(member.Id);
  else
      return false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
this.Id == null && member.Id == null could be rewritten as this.Id == member.Id –  McDowell Aug 30 '13 at 21:39

If fields are implemented with wrapper classes (Integer, Boolean, and so on),

then implementation of equals is simpler, since there is only one case : calling the equals method recursively.

In an equals method, it is usually worthwhile to order field comparisons such that the most significant comparisons are performed first. That is, fields most likely to differ should be evaluated first.

This allows the && "short-circuit" logical operator to minimize execution time.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.