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My question is similar to this, however I'm asking something a bit different.

It is clear, that it is possible to use the address of the first std::vector element as a C type array. That means that in virtual memory, std::vector elements are contiguous. However, if physical memory is fragmented, it is possible that std::vector is actually split into many parts in the physical memory.

My question is: Are std::vector elements contiguous in physical memory (as well as virtual memory)?

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@hsouza: That's what he linked to. He seems to be asking if the OS itself can "fake" contiguousness but have the "real" memory split; frankly I don't get it. –  GManNickG Aug 30 '13 at 20:27
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Under the hood malloc uses mmap, so the question would be if mmap can give you contiguous physical memory. Have you looked at this: stackoverflow.com/questions/4401912/… –  LarryPel Aug 30 '13 at 20:30
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@user2623967 Virtual vs physical memory is not something C++ cares about. If you somehow escape the world of user space on a typical operating system, dive into the kernel and somehow pokes around in virtual memory mappings, you're outside of what C++ cares about. Pretty much any memory of a user space process can be "fragmented" on page boundaries, but that's nothing a user space process needs to care about, whether it's a C++ std::vector or a plain array in C –  nos Aug 30 '13 at 20:30
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I think the question is about process address space. Generally, OS handles this stuff. Virtual address space is continuous. Data stored in std::vector will span across continuous range of virtual address. Where this data is physically placed - it's up to OS. –  Petr Budnik Aug 30 '13 at 20:31
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@JonathanLeffler: I wish I could +1 edit reasons. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 30 '13 at 21:57
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3 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

The memory used to store the data in a vector must be at contiguous addresses as those addresses are visible to the code.

In a typical case on most modern CPUs/OSes, that will mean the virtual addresses must be contiguous. If those virtual addresses cross a page boundary, then there's a good chance that the physical addresses will no longer be contiguous.

I should add that this is only rarely a major concern. Modern systems have at least some support for such fragmented memory usage right down to the hardware level in many cases. For example, many network and disk controllers include "scatter/gather" capability, where the OS uses the page tables to translate the virtual addresses for the buffer to physical addresses, then supplies a number of physical addresses directly to the controller, which then gathers the data from those addresses if it's transferring from memory to peripheral or "scatters" the data out to those addresses if it's transferring from peripheral to memory.

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No, there is no guarantee that you will be provided contiguous physical memory in C++'s abstract machine. Abstractions and hardware below malloc are free to use discontiguous memory.

Only your targeted implementation could make such a guarantee, but the language/model does not care. It relies on the system to do its job.

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Virtual to physical memory mapping is handled largely by the CPU, but with kernel support. A userland process cannot know what this mapping is: your program, no matter what the programming language, deals solely in virtual memory addresses. You cannot expect, nor is there any way of even finding out, if two adjacent virtual memory addresses that straddle a page boundary are adjacent in physical memory, so there is absolutely no point worrying about it.

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"nor is there any way of even finding out" - well, this in general is not true, typically every OS provide some way to find out (albeit it may be obscure or require custom drivers) stackoverflow.com/questions/6252063/… stackoverflow.com/questions/366602/…; on the other hand, I agree that there's no standard way to do such a thing. –  Matteo Italia Aug 30 '13 at 22:46
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For example, interrogating a custom driver that performs the steps described in the first link above and returns the result to it; for the use, it may be the frontend for a kernel debugger, or a hack tool or whatever. My point is that saying that "there's no way to find out" is not correct, simply there's no standard or simple way. I know that it's nitpicking (and in fact, the +1 you have here is mine), but I don't like absolute statements which are incorrect. –  Matteo Italia Aug 30 '13 at 23:05
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With that logic, a userland process then cannot even write on a file, or display text on screen or do any meaningful work besides writing data inside its address space and wasting CPU cycles. –  Matteo Italia Aug 30 '13 at 23:28
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I agree, I went too deep in nitpicking :) ; just to clean this mess up, my original point was: it's false that there's no way to know the virtual=>physical mapping, since the OS knows and the process can ask the OS (and in line of principle there's no reason why it shouldn't provide this information - it's just mostly useless); however it is true that a process in ring 3 cannot know by its own means this mapping, so, if there's no API or driver available to provide you this information, yes, it has no way to know. I think we can both agree with this, the rest are "semantic" problems. –  Matteo Italia Aug 31 '13 at 0:15
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@MatteoItalia, yes, I understand and agree that is it, in principle, possible to expose this information to userland, but what conceivable purpose would it serve? Most of the time, the kernel doesn't even care about the exact values in the TLBs and just walks the page tables when the CPU asks it to. I guess the reason that this information isn't exposed to userland is that you couldn't really do anything useful with it if you had it. To be honest, I'd actually quite like to have that facility as a pure curiosity, useless or not. –  Emmet Aug 31 '13 at 0:30
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