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Section 3.5 of Starting Out With Python, "Passing Arguments to Functions" has an example I'm not following:

# This program demonstrates an argument being
# passed to a function

def main():
    value = 5
    show_double(value)

# The show_double function accepts an argument
# and displays double its value

def show_double(number):
    result = number * 2
    print result


#call main function
main()

I don't get how (number) following the function show_double relates at all to the main function, or relates to anything. I also don't understand why its listed in the main function as show_double(value). I am at a loss as to why both instances of show_double() don't use the same arguments passed into it?

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In main, you're calling show_double with value. The def show_double(number) is where you define show_double. In a sense, it means that when you call show_double, you'll replace number with the value in the parentheses. –  thegrinner Aug 30 '13 at 20:29
    
Thank you so much, i think i get it now! –  user2734243 Aug 30 '13 at 20:32
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9 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

show_double(value) is a function call, and the argument is value. You basically call show_double this way from the main function.

def show_double(number): This is basically where the function defition starts for that particular functionality. You can call it from elsewhere like from the main function.

The number argument makes it possible for you to call this function with any concrete value, so it is not hard coded then, and not using a global variable either. In this special case, you will pass the value 5 to it for printing, but this could anything like 6, 7, 10 or so with another function invocation. Basically, this way you can make your printing flexible.

In your code, the main function is called from the end so the chain will be:

main -> show_double (this will print your value) -> back to main

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I guess what im having a hard time understanding, is why it needs to have (number) –  user2734243 Aug 30 '13 at 20:34
    
@user2734243: does my update help with understanding that? –  Final Contest Aug 30 '13 at 20:36
    
it does, thank you! –  user2734243 Aug 30 '13 at 20:37
    
@user2734243 it does not have to have number. This could be a function that just sets a number to a variable and then doubles it. However, this concept is very important in the future for dealing with passing information between functions. –  nwalsh Aug 30 '13 at 20:38
    
@user2734243: you are welcome! –  Final Contest Aug 30 '13 at 20:44
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So when you call a function with (), you're saying I want this function to run. At the bottom, you're calling the main function, which in turn calls the show_double function with an argument of 5.

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Basically show_double(value) passes the value defined in the main function to show_double(number) function which is expecting a number to receive as an argument

def main():
    value = 5
    show_double(value)  # Function Call

# The show_double function accepts an argument
# and displays double its value

def show_double(number): # Function defination
    result = number * 2
    print result


#call main function
main()
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main function calls the show_double() passing the argument value.

Then value is doubled inside function and returned

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whats happening in a nutshell:

main just takes value = 5, and slaps it into the show double function

in a way you can rewrite the entire code like this ( since its relatively simple) but it may help comprehension

def main():
    value = 5 #the main() part

    result = value * 2 #the show_double(number) part (notice how i changed the number varialbe to value, so you can follow what is happening to 'value'
    print result
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So you see how at the bottom of your code you have a call to main()? That is what runs the main function, or lets the compiler/interpreter to know which function to run. In the main function it does the same thing except now the function it calls is show_double(number). In the parentheses is a 'parameter', a value that must be sent in a call. So, to satisfy this the main method calls show_double(value) which is the same as show_double(5). Now we are in the show_double function. Here it takes the argument 5 and sets it into a variable called number. It doubles it and then returns it back to main.

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a function get parameter by index, not by name. that's why number and value is not related but it just work

function test(first, second, third):
    print first
    print second
    print third

param1 = 'hello'
param2 = 'world'
test(param1, param2, 'python')

result

hello
world
python
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I explain below how Python processes your program. I formulate the general rules and show how they apply to your program. There are many other rules (such as return), so what I write below are just simplifications of the true general rules.

Python executes (i.e. processes) a program from from top to bottom. So first the def main ... block (including the lines starting with spaces below it) is executed, which creates the main function. Then the def show_double ... block (with the indented lines following it) is executed, which creates the show_double function. Then the main() line is executed, which calls the main function. A function call executes the body (i.e. the lines starting with spaces) of a function from top to bottom. After the whole function body has been processed, execution continues in the line below the call. Now there is no such line below main, so the program exits.

To execute main, Python executes the value = 5 line, which creates the local variable value. That variable is available only within the main call. Then show_double(value) is executed, which is a function call, so the next line to be executed would be the first line of the body of show_number. But before that, Python creates the local variable named number (because it's in def show_number(...)), and initializes it with the value of value (i.e. 5), because value was specified in the show_number(...) call. The items within the parentheses in a function call are called arguments. They are used to specify input to the called function. At the call site (show_number(value)) value is specified as input, whose value (5) becomes available as the local variable number.

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This helped me a ton! thank you so much! –  user2734243 Aug 30 '13 at 20:44
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when you call show_double(value), it passes 'value' into the 'number' parameter. def show_double(number) is not looking for a variable named number, it just means the first argument(in this case 'value') will be assigned to the variable 'number' within the show_double function.

you could also call show_double(5) and it would then assign 5 to the number variable within the show_double function.

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