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I really need your help regarding a problem which may seem easy to solve for you.

Currently I work on a project which involves some panel-regressions. I have several large csv-files (up to 12 million entries per sheet) which are formatted as in the picture attached, whereas the columns (V1, V2) are individuals and the rows (1, 2, 3) are time identifiers.

In order to use the plm()-function I need all these files to convert to the following data structure:

ID Time X1 X2
1 1 x1 x2
1 2 x1 x2
1 ... ... ...
2 1 x1 x2
2 2 ... ...

I really struggle with this transformation and I'm really frustrated right now i.e. where do I get the identifier and the time index from? Would really appreciate if you could provide me with information how to solve this problem.

If my question is not clear to you, just ask.

Best regards and thanks in advance

enter image description here

The output should look like as follows:

enter image description here

share|improve this question
    
This is how it should look like: imgur.com/uAHL07w –  user2734306 Aug 30 '13 at 20:55
1  
You can use reshape2 package –  Metrics Aug 30 '13 at 21:34
    
Thank you for your answer And how would the code look like since I don't have Time or Identifier Variables? –  user2734306 Aug 31 '13 at 13:56
    
You need to dput the sample data for reproducibility –  Metrics Aug 31 '13 at 14:48
    
file-upload.net/download-8028487/example.html That's one of the files. They all have a similar structure. Each column is a time series for an individual –  user2734306 Aug 31 '13 at 14:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
 mydata<-structure(list(V1 = 10:13, V2 = 21:24, V3 = c(31L, 32L, 3L, 34L
    )), .Names = c("V1", "V2", "V3"), class = "data.frame", row.names = c(NA, 
    -4L))

> mydata
  V1 V2 V3
1 10 21 31
2 11 22 32
3 12 23  3
4 13 24 34

The following code can be used for your data without changing anything. For illustration, I used just the above data. I used the base R reshape function

long <- reshape(mydata, idvar = "time", ids = row.names(mydata),
                times = names(mydata), timevar = "id",
                varying = list(names(mydata)),v.names="value", new.row.names = 1:((dim(mydata)[2])*(dim(mydata)[1])),direction = "long")

> long
   id value time
1  V1    10    1
2  V1    11    2
3  V1    12    3
4  V1    13    4
5  V2    21    1
6  V2    22    2
7  V2    23    3
8  V2    24    4
9  V3    31    1
10 V3    32    2
11 V3     3    3
12 V3    34    4
long$id<-substr(long$id,2,4) # 4 is used to take into account your 416 variables
myout<-long[,c(1,3,2)]
> myout
   id time value
1   1    1    10
2   1    2    11
3   1    3    12
4   1    4    13
5   2    1    21
6   2    2    22
7   2    3    23
8   2    4    24
9   3    1    31
10  3    2    32
11  3    3     3
12  3    4    34
share|improve this answer
    
Perfect. It works! Thank you so much! –  user2734306 Aug 31 '13 at 19:25
    
Glad that it worked for you. Please consider accepting the answer so that future user may find it helpful. –  Metrics Aug 31 '13 at 19:26
    
+1. prod(dim(mydata)) is much more legible than (dim(mydata)[2])*(dim(mydata)[1]). It seems to me that the time and id variables are the opposite of what I would have expected though. –  Ananda Mahto Sep 2 '13 at 3:26
    
@Metrics, you might also want to check out my "splitstackshape" package. See my answer. –  Ananda Mahto Sep 2 '13 at 3:35
    
@ Ananda: You are right. It's just the opposite here. I will look into it. Thanks. –  Metrics Sep 2 '13 at 13:15

Here is an alternative: Use Stacked from my "splitstackshape" package.

Here it is applied on @Metrics's sample data:

# install.packages("splitstackshape")
library(splitstackshape)
Stacked(cbind(id = 1:nrow(mydata), mydata), 
        id.vars="id", var.stubs="V", sep = "V")
#     id .time_1  V
#  1:  1       1 10
#  2:  1       2 21
#  3:  1       3 31
#  4:  2       1 11
#  5:  2       2 22
#  6:  2       3 32
#  7:  3       1 12
#  8:  3       2 23
#  9:  3       3  3
# 10:  4       1 13
# 11:  4       2 24
# 12:  4       3 34

It would be very fast if your data are large. Here are the speeds for the 12MB dataset you linked to. The sorting is different but the data are the same.

It still isn't faster than stack though (but at some point, stack starts to slow down).

See the system.times below:

reshape()

system.time(out <- reshape(x, idvar = "time", ids = row.names(x),
                           times = names(x), timevar = "id",
                           varying = list(names(x)), 
                           v.names="value",
                           new.row.names = 1:prod(dim(x)), 
                           direction = "long"))
#    user  system elapsed 
#   53.11    0.00   53.11 
head(out)
#   id        value time
# 1 V1  0.003808635    1
# 2 V1 -0.018807416    2
# 3 V1  0.008875447    3
# 4 V1  0.001148695    4
# 5 V1 -0.019365004    5
# 6 V1  0.012436560    6

Stacked()

system.time(out2 <- Stacked(cbind(id = 1:nrow(x), x), 
                            id.vars="id", var.stubs="V", 
                            sep = "V"))
#    user  system elapsed 
#    0.30    0.00    0.29 

out2
#           id .time_1            V
#      1:    1       1  0.003808635
#      2:    1      10 -0.014184635
#      3:    1     100 -0.013341843
#      4:    1     101  0.006784138
#      5:    1     102  0.006463707
#     ---                          
# 963868: 2317      95  0.009569451
# 963869: 2317      96  0.002497771
# 963870: 2317      97  0.009202519
# 963871: 2317      98  0.017007545
# 963872: 2317      99 -0.002495842

stack()

system.time(out3 <- cbind(id = 1:nrow(x), stack(x)))
#    user  system elapsed 
#    0.09    0.00    0.09
head(out3)
#   id       values ind
# 1  1  0.003808635  V1
# 2  2 -0.018807416  V1
# 3  3  0.008875447  V1
# 4  4  0.001148695  V1
# 5  5 -0.019365004  V1
# 6  6  0.012436560  V1
share|improve this answer
    
My observation is that the stack is superfast because it is using data.table. Is that correct? –  Metrics Sep 2 '13 at 13:18
    
@Metrics, Stacked (my function) uses unlist in data.table. stack is pure base R. –  Ananda Mahto Sep 2 '13 at 14:52
    
Thanks @Ananda for clarification. –  Metrics Sep 2 '13 at 15:07

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