Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i've been messing around with ruby and opengl for entertainment purposes, and i decided to write some 3d vector/plane/etc classes to pretty up some of the math.

simplified example:

class Vec3
    attr_accessor :x,:y,:z

    def *(a)
        if a.is_a?(Numeric) #multiply by scalar
            return Vec3.new(@x*a, @y*a, @z*a)
        elsif a.is_a?(Vec3) #dot product
            return @x*a.x + @y*a.y + @z*a.z
        end
    end
end

v1 = Vec3.new(1,1,1)
v2 = v1*5 #produces [5,5,5]

which all fine and dandy, but i also want to be able to write

v2 = 5*v1

which requires adding functionality to Fixnum or Float or whatever, but i couldn't find a way to overload or extend fixnum's multiplication without replacing it entirely. is this possible in ruby? any tips?

(obviously i can just write all my multiplications in the correct order if i need to)

share|improve this question
    
Just for the record, change @x*s, @y*s, @z*s to @x*a, @y*a, @z*a, otherwise your code is broken. –  Chris Lutz Dec 6 '09 at 7:39
    
thanks, copied code from 2 places at once >< should be fixed now –  user225620 Dec 6 '09 at 12:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Using coerce is a MUCH better approach than monkey-patching a core class:

class Vec3
    attr_accessor :x,:y,:z

    def *(a)
        if a.is_a?(Numeric) #multiply by scalar
            return Vec3.new(@x*a, @y*a, @z*a)
        elsif a.is_a?(Vec3) #dot product
            return @x*a.x + @y*a.y + @z*a.z
        end
    end

    def coerce(other)
        return self, other
    end
end

if you define v as v = Vec3.new then the following will work: v * 5 and 5 * v The first element returned by coerce (self) becomes the new receiver for the operation, and the second element (other) becomes the parameter, so 5 * v is exactly equivalent to v * 5

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for coerce. On behalf of the person who has to debug your code, please don't monkeypatch core classes unless super-duper-absolutely necessary. –  zenazn Dec 6 '09 at 7:29
    
this worked great for what i needed. if i run into a similar example that can't be commutative then i suppose i'll monkey patch as needed ;) –  user225620 Dec 6 '09 at 12:18

I believe the following will do what you want, though banister's suggestion to use coerce instead of monkey-patching Numeric is a preferred method. Use this method only if necessary (for example if you only want some binary operands to be transitive).

Fixnum.class_eval do
  original_times = instance_method(:*)
  define_method(:*) do |other|
    if other.kind_of?(Vec3)
      return other * self
    else
      return original_times.bind(self).call(other)
    end
  end
end
share|improve this answer
1  
mmm sexy :) btw, i needed to change the first line to "Fixnum.class_eval do" or (the equivalent?) "class Fixnum" –  user225620 Dec 6 '09 at 3:20
1  
is it not possible just to define it directly on Fixnum class without the class_eval, and to do a regular def rather than a define_method ? –  banister Dec 6 '09 at 3:40
1  
alias_method unnecessarily pollutes the namespace. This idiom is neither "ridiculous" (it is a well-known idiom, the inner workings of which as well as the necessity have been well-documented in many a blog post) nor is it "completely unnecessary" (it is, in fact, the only idiom known to work, AFAIK). –  Jörg W Mittag Dec 6 '09 at 8:31
1  
banister's suggestion for coerce is a much better solution for the commutivity problem, though. +1 for it. –  James A. Rosen Dec 6 '09 at 15:55
1  
Oh, and banister: an "ordinary class body" will work fine for Numeric, which is surely defined at this point, but is dangerous in other cases, as it might prevent an autoload statement from firing. –  James A. Rosen Dec 6 '09 at 16:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.