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I am trying to create a class library that will allow me to read data from a list and then output the data in json format. Below is a screenshot of the json that a client would like me emulate. I believe would like to use json.net library to create this json file but am struggling with how to create my c# classes and collections in order to get to the output specified below.

The top level objects are suppose to be OEM objects so I am expecting to see "OEM" in the places where you see "7","8","27","49","16".

For instance if my OEM class looks like:

public class OEM
{
    public int OemID { get; set; }

}

and the code to create json is:

List<asbs.OEM> Oems = new List<asbs.OEM>();
   asbs.OEM oem = new asbs.OEM() { OemID = 7 };
   Oems.Add(oem);

   string json = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(Oems, Formatting.Indented);
   this._txt_Output.Text = json;

the output comes out like this:

[
  {
    "OemID": 7
  }
]

How can I get the object to be named "7" instead of OemId? Is this possible or is the json file not conducive for creation by using reusable objects like my OEM object?

Desired json format

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

One way to get your OEM ids to serialize with numeric property names is to put them into a dictionary and serialize that rather than the Oems list. Here is how you can do that easily:

// Original list of OEM objects
List<asbs.OEM> Oems = new List<asbs.OEM>();
Oems.Add(new asbs.OEM() { OemID = 7 });
Oems.Add(new asbs.OEM() { OemID = 8 });
Oems.Add(new asbs.OEM() { OemID = 27 });

// Create a new dictionary from the list, using the OemIDs as keys
Dictionary<int, asbs.OEM> dict = Oems.ToDictionary(o => o.OemID);

// Now serialize the dictionary
string json = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(dict, Formatting.Indented);

You may also want to decorate the OemID property with the [JsonIgnore] attribute so that it is not included elsewhere in the serialization output (unless you want it to be there).

For other properties, if these are named differently in the class than what you want the serialized output to be, you can control that by using the [JsonProperty] attribute.

public class OEM
{
    [JsonIgnore]
    public int OemID { get; set; }

    [JsonProperty(PropertyName="cars")]
    public CarInfo Cars { get; set; }

    [JsonProperty(PropertyName = "suvs")]
    public CarInfo Suvs { get; set; }

    // other properties
}

That should be enough to get you started. If you need even more control over what is output, you can look into creating a custom JsonConverter for your OEM class.

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That is because you have a List or Array of objects. The JSON you provided is just an object that contains nested objects. Basically as a rule of thumb;

Anywhere you see "propertyName": { ... } you need and object in the C# code Anywhere you see "propertyName": [ ... ] you need a List<T> or T[] (array) of the enclosed type. You're going to have to write a custom serializer because integers are not valid property names in C# and a bunch of the objects in your sample json have names like "7".

So to do a little bit of it for you, you need something like this;

public class jsonWrapper
{
    public Seven seven { get; set; }
}

public class Seven
{
    public All all { get; set; }
}

public class All
{
    public Cars cars { get; set; }
}

public class Cars
{
    public Portrait Portrait { get; set; }
}

public class Portrait
{
    public Landscape Landscape { get; set; }
}

public class Landscape
{
    public Background Background { get; set; }
}

public class Background
{
     public Element[] Elements { get; set; } // the only array I see in your json
}

public class Element
{
    //properties that you have collapsed
}
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thanks for this. –  ChiliYago Aug 31 '13 at 16:45

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