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I have the following java method

public static double realDivision(Integer num, Double denom) {
  double result = 0.0;
  try{
      result=(double)num/(double)denom;
  }
  catch (ArithmeticException e){
    System.err.println("Smart up Goof");
    e.printStackTrace(System.err);
  }
  return result;

}

What I am trying to achieve here is for exceptions to be more descriptive. How can I get Java to smart up a bit and throw a NullPointerException when the one of the numbers are null, and throw something like undefined number exception when both inputs equal zero. It should also be more expressive about divide by zero with a non-zero numerator. How do I do all that?

EDITED I don't want a bunch of conditionals, like null checks or checks for zero. I was hoping Java knows why the arithmetic exception or NPE occurred and and throw that precise exception. If I can make java do that I get to write the error handling code the way it should be.

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You can write your own exceptions and then manually throw those... –  Kon Aug 30 '13 at 22:11
1  
You can't increase smartness of Java. you will have to code for that. –  Narendra Pathai Aug 30 '13 at 22:13
    
Also to point out, two exceptions are not thrown at same time, only one of those will be thrown –  Narendra Pathai Aug 30 '13 at 22:14
    
What do you need more precise exceptions for? What are you planning to do with it? If it is just to print a better message, you can do it in your catch{..} –  azzurroverde Aug 30 '13 at 22:15
    
Lol at getting java to smart up! –  jbx Aug 30 '13 at 22:16

3 Answers 3

You need to distinguish between the two variables being null and the value being zero. If you run your program like this, where the two variables are null, you have the exception you wanted:

public class Arithmetics {      
      public static double realDivision(Integer num, Double denom) {
          double result = 0.0;
          try{
              result=(double)num/(double)denom;
          }
          catch (ArithmeticException e){
            System.err.println("Smart up Goof");
            e.printStackTrace(System.err);
          }
          return result;

        }

    public static void main(String[] args) {            
        double results=Arithmetics.realDivision(null, null);
        System.out.println(results);

    }

}

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NullPointerException
    at Arithmetics.realDivision(Arithmetics.java:7)
    at Arithmetics.main(Arithmetics.java:19)

EDITED And ... if you use values

double results=Arithmetics.realDivision(new Integer(0), new Double(0));

the results are

NaN

if you use

double results=Arithmetics.realDivision(new Integer(1), new Double(0));

The results are

infinite
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And if you want to deal with the problem, use logic before the division. For example if(num.intValue()==0){} ... –  azzurroverde Aug 30 '13 at 22:39

Java already throws two different exceptions, not at the same time, but according to which one occurs. Maybe you mean how to catch two possibly different exceptions? Like for example:

public static double realDivision(Integer num, Double denom) {
          double result = 0.0;
          try{
              if(num.intValue()==0){

              }
              result=(double)num/(double)denom;
          }
          catch (ArithmeticException e){
            System.err.println("Smart up Goof");
            e.printStackTrace(System.err);
          }
          catch (NullPointerException e){
                System.err.println("One of the numbers is null. I am smart. Java");
                e.printStackTrace(System.err);
              }
          return result;

        }

Note however that in this case ArithmeticException will not be thrown because you are using floating points. If you use integer, you will have the exception.

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You can do it by simply adding checks inside the try - catch block. Something like:

if ((num == null) || (denum == null))
{
   throw new NullPointerException("Argument is null");
}

However I should be a bit wary of using unchecked exceptions like that, since they will bubble up your stack without forcing the caller to catch it.

Maybe creating your own exception and declaring your method to throw it would be better.

UPDATED after question was edited.

Why not simply change it to this:

public static double realDivision(int num, double denom) 
{
  return (double) num / denom;    
}

The parameters are now primitives not Objects, so they cannot be null. The arguments you pass to the function can still be instances of Integer and Double, and Java's Autoboxing feature will do the translation for you (throwing an Exception if they are null).

The only check you need to do manually in this case if you want to is whether the denom is 0. Its because in the case of double Java returns Infinity rather than throwing an ArithmeticException, because in reality that is the answer and its useful in certain double precision calculations. If you were using integers you would get the ArithmeticException.

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