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I am implementing design patterns in C++ and I want my classes to utilise the interfaces via composition, this has lead me to study the different ways to implement interfaces. I would like to clarify the definitions of this terminology.

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up vote 5 down vote accepted

A non-virtual interface is a public member function that's not virtual, but usually expected to be implemented in terms of a virtual function which is overridable:

class Interface
{
public:
    int compute()
    {
        return compute_impl();
    }
private:
    virtual int compute_impl() = 0;
protected:
    virtual ~Interface() { }
};

The neat thing here is that the implementation is actually private, since you can still override private methods - you just can't call them from the outside.

By contrast, an abstract interface is itself virtual, and purely so in the interface class:

class Interface
{
public:
    virtual int compute() = 0;
protected:
    virtual ~Interface() { }
};

While the two approaches look superficially similar, the advantage of the non-virtual interface idiom is that the interface is not encumbered with the implementation detail of virtual member functions. In other words, the fact that different implementations of the interface satisfy its contract by overriding a virtual functions is a detail of the implementation that is not part of the public aspect of the interface. In particular, the author is free to change the way the function is implemented in the future without having to worry about users having developed their own inheritance and override hierarchies.

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Nice answer. I used this exact paradigm when implementing a structure for different kinds of algorithms which all needed to be tracked of memory usage and time spent. In the int Interface::compute() method I had some basic stuff to set up memory usage and timing, while the actual algorithm went into virtual int compute_impl(). – rwols Aug 30 '13 at 23:40

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