Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to calculate the delta in milliseconds with something like this:

int olddelta = 0;
    int delta = 0;
    const clock_t begin_time = clock();
    while (true) {
        olddelta=delta;
        delta=clock()-olddelta;
        cout<<delta<<endl;
}

however this is not working as the delta is definitely not over 4000, and it seems to get progressively higher. What have i done incorrectly?

share|improve this question
    
What is it you're trying to do in the first place? Is delta supposed to be per iteration or accumulated over the life of the while-loop which is infinite). I think you're trying the former of those if you are expecting similar numbers with each iteration, and if so, this is just the wrong algorithm. –  WhozCraig Aug 31 '13 at 0:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Since you are using clock(), you need to divide it by CLOCKS_PER_SEC to obtain the result expressed in seconds. To get fractions, cast clock() to double before the division:

double olddelta = 0;
double delta = 0;
const double begin_time = clock();
while (true) {
    olddelta = delta;
    delta=clock()-olddelta;
    cout << (delta/CLOCKS_PER_SEC) << endl;
}

If you want to measure the time of a single iteration, change the loop as follows:

double olddelta = 0;
double delta = 0;
const double begin_time = clock();
while (true) {
    double now = clock();
    delta = now - begin_time;
    cout << (delta/CLOCKS_PER_SEC) << endl;
    begin_time = now;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This will change the display, to be sure, but something seems "odd" with the OP's surprise that this causes the progressively higher output it emits. –  WhozCraig Aug 31 '13 at 0:42
1  
@WhozCraig I doubt that the OP is surprised by the numbers getting higher, only by the numbers getting higher by so much. 4000 seems like a large number or like a small number if one does not know what it means. My physics teacher used to jokingly ask if three hairs is too much or too little, and his answer was that if it's on the top of one's head, it's too little, and if it's in a bowl of one's soup, that's way too many ;-) –  dasblinkenlight Aug 31 '13 at 0:43
    
following your advice I still get an output that gets progressively higher, ex 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10. Additionally is greater than one second a ridiculously high amount of time to execute such a simple while loop as the one above? –  user2673108 Aug 31 '13 at 1:18
    
@user2673108 Your math is somewhat strange, because you store the begin_time, but never use it. If you want to measure the time of a single iteration, change the loop body as shown in the edited answer. –  dasblinkenlight Aug 31 '13 at 1:24
    
Love the hair-analogy, but as I suspected, there seems to be an expectation for something different. I think he's looking for a per-iteration delta, but again, without confirmation from the OP that continues to be speculation on my part, further supported by their continued surprise of their increasing values. Edit: +1. You pretty much covered the whole gambit now. –  WhozCraig Aug 31 '13 at 1:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.