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I might have a Dog class that has a single instance shared across multiple threads. I plan on using SLF4J for all logging:

public class Dog {
    private Logger logger = LoggerFactory.getLogger(Dog.class);

    // ...etc.
}

Is my logger instance thread safe? Why/why not?

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2 Answers

Certainly, everyone and his dog assumes that a Logger is going to be thread-safe. But you would need to look at the code / javadocs of the implementation classes behind the facade to be absolutely sure.

For specific implementations:

(Obviously, these are statements that the respective code is designed to thread-safe. There can always be bugs. For example, there are currently a couple of open thread-safety bugs in the Log4j tracker (see http://bugzilla.slf4j.org/buglist.cgi?quicksearch=thread-safe), though it doesn't seem like those bugs would directly affect your example code.)

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Thanks @Stepen C (+1) - so are you saying that it depends on the binding to determine whether its thread-safe or not? What about the SLF4J API itself? –  user1768830 Aug 31 '13 at 1:42
    
No I can't. For a start, the thread safety ultimately depends on the implemented behaviour of logger code that is not part of SLF4J! (You do understand that SLF4J is a facade ... don't you?) –  Stephen C Aug 31 '13 at 1:43
    
Yep - I understand SLF4J is a facade. Perhaps I'm asking the wrong question here. Given my code example above, if the Dog instance exists across 2+ threads, do I need to worry - regardless of the SLF4J binding I use at runtime - about bizarre logger behavior, or can I rest assured that (again, regardless of the binding) I won't have shared logging state across the threads? –  user1768830 Aug 31 '13 at 1:46
    
@TicketMonster - I can't give you that assurance. If you need it, you will need to do your own research; i.e. do a forensic analysis of the code base. –  Stephen C Aug 31 '13 at 1:58
    
Well let me put it this way: in the web application I maintain that has dozens of users hammering at the same time, the logging is nice and sequential and not one big pile of character garbage. Based on those test results I -know- the logging is thread safe, I don't need to look at the code at all. –  Gimby Mar 14 at 14:20
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

In conclusion: LoggerFactory.getLogger(Class<?>) "caches" Logger instances based on class. So if I call LoggerFactory.getLogger(Dog.class) twice, I'll get 2 references to the same object in memory. This means that if 2+ threads instantiate a Dog, they'll both get the same (shared) Dog Logger instance.

So the SLF4J API is not thread-safe. It's all up to the binding you choose. It looks like the common bindings (log4j, JUL and logback) are thread-safe, so even if multiple threads get access to the same Dog Logger, the log4j/JUL/logback logger binding is thread-safe, so you have no issues.

Case in point: if you are making your own SLF4J binding, make all your Logger impl methods synchronized, or address thread-safety in a different way (providing ThreadLocal, etc.).

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I'm afraid that the reasoning of this answer is flawed. The fact that you can get two references to the same Logger in different threads does not make SLF4J non-thread-safe. All we can say is that the thread-safety of SLF4J depends on the thread-safety of the implementation behind the facade. –  Stephen C Mar 14 at 13:48
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