Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to change the value attribute in my input (type radio) when a different radio button is changed I would like to call a function and change the value being sent in the form:

<table border ='1'>
    <tr>
        <th colspan='2'>Thank You</th>
    </tr>
    <tr> 
        <td>
            <input type='radio' name='Choice' value=5 onchange="changeAmount('5');">
        </td>
        <td>
            I
        </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>
            <input type='radio' name='Choice' value=10 onchange="changeAmount('10');">
        </td>                            
        <td>
            $10 
        </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>
            <input type='radio' name='Choice' value=20 onchange="changeAmount('20');">
        </td> 
        <td>
            $20
        </td>
    </tr>
</table>

<form action="insertPageHere" method="post" target="_top">   

function changeAmount(value){
    if (value == 5)
    document.write("<input type='hidden' name='amount' value='5'>");
    else if (value == 10)
    document.write("<input type='hidden' t' value='10'>");
    else
    document.write("<input type='hidden' name='t' value='20'>");

}
</script>


</form>

I'ved tried doing this with php and I had similar problems, if anyone can give me advance on how to get this work, that would be greatly appreciated thank you.

share|improve this question
    
try adding id tags to each of your inputs, and identify them by id –  stronghold Aug 31 '13 at 4:33
    
I've heard document.write() is not a good way to modify something. It is better to modify the element than write a new one. –  Paul Aug 31 '13 at 4:48
    
@Paul For certain things, in particular including scripts, document.write is the most reliable option. In this case you are right that it would be better to change an existing element (or actually use the radio button in the form). –  Sumurai8 Aug 31 '13 at 7:45

2 Answers 2

This is exactly where forms were designed for. There is no reason why you would use javascript to add, or change, a hidden input field to pass this information on, because this will do exactly the same if you put it between the form tags.

<form>
  <input type='radio' name='amount' value="5"> 5 <br/>
  <input type='radio' name='amount' value="10"> 10 <br/>
  <input type='radio' name='amount' value="20"> 20
</form>

On a side note: Using tables for your markup is discouraged and, in this case, unneeded too. The code above will do exactly the same and if it is needed, you can add a margin to your radio buttons to space them more from the 5, 10 and 20.

share|improve this answer
    
It was that simple the whole time, Thank you so much –  ssturges Aug 31 '13 at 18:22

I agree with Sumurai8 - it sounds like you probably just want to put your radio inputs inside a form.

If there's a good reason why that's not the case, though, how about something along the following lines (see it in action in this jsFiddle - note that the JS just gets appended to the HTML in a script tag, and also note I've tidied up your HTML a little):

(function() {
    function changeAmount(element) {
        var amountElement = document.getElementById('amount');
        var amount = element.value;
        amountElement.value = amount;
    }

    var choices = document.getElementsByName('Choice');
    for (var i=0; i < choices.length; i++) {
        var choice = choices[i];
        choice.onchange = function() { changeAmount(this); }
    }
})();

You just need to but that in a <script type="text/javascript"> tag, below all the HTML (including the <form> shown in the jsFiddle link).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.