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How can I do this in Python?

first string = GOOD MORNING
second string = GOOD BYE

After 5 characters there is no match

in C, it can be done as:

length = strspn(str1,str2);
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closed as off-topic by perreal, Tushar Gupta, Tadeusz Kopec, laalto, tcaswell Sep 1 '13 at 2:40

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  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – perreal, Tushar Gupta, Tadeusz Kopec, laalto, tcaswell
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
Your example and the reference function are entirely different. Which one of them are you expecting and what have you tried so far? –  thefourtheye Aug 31 '13 at 6:05
    
I want to find upto what position the two strings are equal. –  reshmi g Aug 31 '13 at 6:07
7  
Are you just going to keep asking "how do I replicate this C standard library function in Python"? Are you trying to port something to Python without knowing Python? You should probably try to figure this stuff out yourself; it's not that hard, and you'll learn something. –  user2357112 Aug 31 '13 at 6:10
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7 Answers 7

For the sake of diversity

from itertools import takewhile, izip
sum(1 for x in takewhile(lambda x: x[0] == x[1], 
   izip(iter('GOOD MORNING'), iter('GOOD BYE'))))
5
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It works also with just``izip(first, second)`` –  eyquem Aug 31 '13 at 15:53
    
@eyquem, indeed it does. The iter is in place to demonstrate that this works with iterators and not just sequences –  1_CR Aug 31 '13 at 15:55
    
In general, I don't like to import additional tools. But, as it is a stupid opinion, I upvote because I thought to sum() but didn't think to takewhile –  eyquem Aug 31 '13 at 15:56
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def matcher(A, B):
    for i in range(min(len(A), len(B))):
        if A[i] != B[i]:
            return i
    return min(len(A), len(B))

print str(matcher("GOOD MORNING", "GOOD BYE")) + " characters match"

def strspn(A, B):
    for i in range(len(A)):
        if A[i] not in B:
            return i
    return len(A)

print "129th has " + str(strspn("129th", "0123456789")) + " digits"

Output

5 characters match
129th has 3 digits
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Two methods:

first = 'GOOD MORNING'
second = 'GOOD BYE'

import difflib
sq = difflib.SequenceMatcher(None,first,second)
m = min(len(first),len(second))
print sq.find_longest_match(0,m,0,m)[2]

print '-----------'

print (i for i in xrange(min(len(first),len(second)))
       if first[i]!=second[i]).next()

result

5
-----------
5
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+1. sq.find_longest_match(0,m,0,m)[2] can be made more readable with sq.find_longest_match(0,m,0,m).size –  1_CR Aug 31 '13 at 15:27
    
@1_CR Fine remark. I wrote indexing [2] because I read in the doc : "difflib.get_close_matches(]) Return a list..." and when I printed sq.find_longest_match(0,m,0,m) and obtained Match(a=0, b=0, size=5), I didn't realize that it isn't a real list but an instance of difflib.Match with attributes. Thank you –  eyquem Aug 31 '13 at 15:46
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def strspn(s1, s2):
    m = min(len(s1), len(s1))
    mismatches = (i for i, (c1, c2)
                  in enumerate(zip(s1[:m], s2[:m])) if c1 != c2)
    return next(mismatches, m)
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1  
Do you know about the next function? You could write next((i for i, (c1, c2) in enumerate(zip(s1, s2)) if c1 != c2), m). –  DSM Aug 31 '13 at 15:07
    
@DSM I did not know that function, love learning new built-ins, thanks! –  Kyler Brown Aug 31 '13 at 15:28
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a = "good morning"
b = "good bye"


differ_idx = None
for idx, a_b in enumerate(zip(a, b)):
    a, b = a_b
    if a != b:
        differ_idx = idx
        break

print "first string = %r" % a
print "second string = %r" % b
if differ_idx is None:
    print "Strings match"
else:
    print "After %d characters there is no match" % differ_idx
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I don't know if python has a build-in function for that, but you can simply write yours

first = 'GOOD MORNING'
second = 'GOOD BYE'
len1 = len(first)
len2 = len(second)
count = 0
for i in range(len1):
    if i < len2 and first[i] == second[i]:
        count += 1
        continue
    else:
        break
return count
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1  
len(first) works with Python, not first.length(). Additionally, you may want to look at Haidro's enumerate solution –  1_CR Aug 31 '13 at 6:30
    
my bad. thank you. –  Hardy Aug 31 '13 at 6:38
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Looks like a job for enumerate:

>>> a = "GOOD MORNING"
>>> b = "GOOD BYE"
>>> temp = max(a, b)
>>> for x, y in enumerate(min(a, b)):
...     if temp[x] != y:
...             print x
...             break
... 
5
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I asked @Hardy to take a look at the enumerate part of your solution but now that I look at it closely, I don't like the fact that you're recomputing max(a, b) in each iteration of the loop! –  1_CR Aug 31 '13 at 6:43
    
@1_CR Hmm, I might as well put it outside of the loop :p –  Haidro Aug 31 '13 at 6:44
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