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For example, the array class has a method named ".sort" that you call on an array with the following syntax:

[2, 3, 4, 1].sort

From my limited knowledge, I only know how to write methods that take an actual parameter:

def sort(array)
   ...
end 

and are called as such:

sort([2, 3, 4, 1])

How would you go about setting up a method that can be called with the dot notation (please correct me if I'm wrong) syntax?

*To clarify, I'm trying to add a method into the existing class Array that can remove duplicate objects. I know the ".uniq" method already does that, but I'm re-writing it for the purpose of learning how its done. I only know how to write the method as such:

def my_uniq(array)
   ...
end

where the array is the parameter that I can work with inside my method.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should start thinking in terms of sending messages to object. i.e. Instead of seeing them as calling methods, see them as sending message to object(s). When you do send messages, the object would check if it can fulfill the request (ie. check if there is a method by that name exists in here or in its parent) if so it does. So in essence, the sort is a message (method) to array object.

class Array
  def sort
    # do sorting
  end

  # example taken from @codycaughlan 
  # allows you to send message `hi` to your array object
  def hi
    "Hi, #{length}"
  end
end

# so instead of calling method hi([2,9,0]) 
# send hi message to an array object

[2,9,0].hi

# instead of calling method sort([2,9,0])
# send sort message to an array object

[2,9,0].sort

Update

Let us say you want to write a method that works on an array that prints * multiplied by the number you pass.

class Array
  def print_stars
    self.each { |i| puts "*" * i}
  end
end

# now let us send a message / call
[1,2,3].print_stars #=> this should produce

*
**
***

As you may already know, these messages can be chained. For e.g.

[1,2,3].reverse.print_stars  #=> produces

***
**
*
share|improve this answer
    
How would I go about "playing" with the array object that I'm sending a message to though. For example, with the method I'm "monkey-patching" to class Array, I would typically take the parameter array, iterate through the array with .each, if element already exists, delete... etc.. How would I write my def to access this array is what I'm trying to say. –  user2684075 Aug 31 '13 at 10:49
    
@user2684075 Inside a method you reference the receiver using the keyword self. –  toro2k Aug 31 '13 at 11:01
    
Or should I say, there is a variable associated with the parameter. What "variable" would I type in the method I'm creating to work with the receiver, or the object I'm sending messages to? –  user2684075 Aug 31 '13 at 11:05
    
oh gotcha! thanks –  user2684075 Aug 31 '13 at 11:05
    
In most cases self is redundant, i.e. you can just write each instead of self.each, just keep in mind that you are sending each to self, i.e. your array instance. –  Stefan Aug 31 '13 at 13:59

It depends on what the "argument" is. In your example of:

[2, 3, 4, 1].sort

The argument is an instance of Array. You could monkey-patch Array to add a method of your choosing:

class Array
  def hi
    "Hi, #{length}"
  end
end

puts [1,2,3].hi

=> Hi, 3
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4  
The receiver is usually not called argument. –  sawa Aug 31 '13 at 8:40

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