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A is a list variable defined as follows:

A= [10 ,78,"m",89]

Why is the value of A[0] and A[-0] the same when executed in the python shell?

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4  
Why is x + 0 the same as x - 0? –  Johnsyweb Aug 31 '13 at 9:22
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Because -0 is the same value as 0:

>>> -0
0

You are referring to the same index, the first value the list. There is no such thing as negative integer zero.

Perhaps you were looking for -1 instead? Negative integers select from the end:

>>> A = [10, 78, "m", 89]
>>> A[0]
10
>>> A[-1]
89
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0 and -0 are the same thing since they are both integer:

>>> dis.dis(lambda x: 0)
  1           0 LOAD_CONST               1 (0)
              3 RETURN_VALUE
>>>
>>> dis.dis(lambda x: -0)
  1           0 LOAD_CONST               1 (0)
              3 RETURN_VALUE
>>>

However, there is a negative zero and positive zero, with float and double. And the parser doesn't skip the sign:

>>> dis.dis(lambda: 0.0)
  1           0 LOAD_CONST               1 (0.0)
              3 RETURN_VALUE
>>> dis.dis(lambda: -0.0)
  1           0 LOAD_CONST               1 (-0.0)
              3 RETURN_VALUE
>>>

In case of negative zero the last bit is 1 and in case of positive zero the last bit is 0. You can see it here:

>>> from struct import pack, unpack
>>>
>>> # with float, 32th bit is 1 in negative zero
>>>
>>> '0x%.8x' % unpack('I', pack('f', -0.0))[0]
'0x80000000'
>>> '0x%.8x' % unpack('I', pack('f', 0.0))[0]
'0x00000000'
>>>
>>> unpack('I', pack('f', -0.0))[0] >> 31
1L
>>> unpack('I', pack('f', 0.0))[0] >> 31
0
>>>
>>> # same thing with double, 64th bit is 1
>>>
>>> '0x%.16x' % unpack('Q', pack('d', 0.0))[0]
'0x0000000000000000'
>>> '0x%.16x' % unpack('Q', pack('d', -0.0))[0]
'0x8000000000000000'
>>>
>>> unpack('Q', pack('d', 0.0))[0] >> 63
0
>>> unpack('Q', pack('d', -0.0))[0] >> 63
1L
>>>

You can read more about IEEE floating point.

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>>> -0 == 0
True

So basically you are looking at the same element.

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This test isn't really sufficient, as it produces misleading results when applied to floats: -0.0 == 0.0 but str(-0.0) != str(0.0) –  Eric Aug 31 '13 at 10:20
    
@Eric Agreed. But list indices must be integers, not float. So I was just trying to answer what the OP has really asked. –  thefourtheye Aug 31 '13 at 10:24
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I think you are confused because of one's complement and two's complement. In one's complement we have 2 zero's and in two's complement we have just one zero, and there is now negative or positive zero.

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