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Using LINQ, from a List<int>, how can I retrieve a list that contains entries repeated more than once and their values?

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duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/3811464/… –  Zac Apr 19 '14 at 14:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 77 down vote accepted

The easiest way to solve the problem is to group the elements based on their value, and then pick a representative of the group if there are more than one element in the group. In linq, this translates to:

var query = lst.GroupBy(x=>x)
              .Where(g=>g.Count()>1)
              .Select(y=>y.Key)
              .ToList();

If you want to know how many times the elements are repeated, you can use:

var query = lst.GroupBy(x=>x)
              .Where(g=>g.Count()>1)
              .Select(y=> new { Element = y.Key, Counter = y.Count()})
              .ToList();

This will return a List of an anonymous type, and each element will have the properties Element and Counter, to retrieve the informations you need.

And lastly, if it's a dictionary you are looking for, you can use

var query = lst.GroupBy(x=>x)
              .Where(g=>g.Count()>1)
              .ToDictionary(x=>x.Key,y=>y.Count());

This will return a dictionary, with your element as key, and the number of times it's repeated as value.

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thank you , now is clear to me how LINQ works, have a nice day. –  Mirko Arcese Aug 31 '13 at 11:14
    
Now just a wonder, let's say that duplicated int are distributed into n int arrays, im using dictionary and for loop to understand which array contains a duplicate and remove it according to a logic of distribution, is there a fastest way (linq wondering) to achieve that result ? thank you in advance for interest. –  Mirko Arcese Aug 31 '13 at 11:25
    
I'm doing something like this : code for (int i = 0; i < duplicates.Count; i++) { int duplicate = duplicates[i]; duplicatesLocation.Add(duplicate, new List<int>()); for (int k = 0; k < hitsList.Length; k++) { if (hitsList[k].Contains(duplicate)) { duplicatesLocation.ElementAt(i).Value.Add(k); } } // remove duplicates according to some rules. } code –  Mirko Arcese Aug 31 '13 at 11:26
    
if you want to find duplicates in a list of arrays, give a look to SelectMany –  Save Aug 31 '13 at 15:31
    
I'm searching for duplicates in an array of lists, but didnt get how selectmany can help me to make it out –  Mirko Arcese Aug 31 '13 at 19:18

Another way is using HashSet:

var hash = new HashSet<int>();
var duplicates = list.Where(i => !hash.Add(i));

Here is the same solution as a generic extension method:

public static class Extensions
{
  public static IEnumerable<TSource> GetDuplicates<TSource, TKey>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, TKey> selector, IEqualityComparer<TKey> comparer)
  {
    var hash = new HashSet<TKey>(comparer);
    return source.Where(item => !hash.Add(selector(item)));
  }

  public static IEnumerable<TSource> GetDuplicates<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, IEqualityComparer<TSource> comparer)
  {
    return source.GetDuplicates(x => x, comparer);      
  }

  public static IEnumerable<TSource> GetDuplicates<TSource, TKey>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, TKey> selector)
  {
    return source.GetDuplicates(selector, null);
  }

  public static IEnumerable<TSource> GetDuplicates<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source)
  {
    return source.GetDuplicates(x => x, null);
  }
}
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You can do this:

var list = new[] {1,2,3,1,4,2};
var duplicateItems = list.Duplicates();

With these extension methods:

public static class Extensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<TSource> Duplicates<TSource, TKey>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, TKey> selector)
    {
        var grouped = source.GroupBy(selector);
        var moreThen1 = grouped.Where(i => i.IsMultiple());
        return moreThen1.SelectMany(i => i);
    }

    public static IEnumerable<TSource> Duplicates<TSource, TKey>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source)
    {
        return source.Duplicates(i => i);
    }

    public static bool IsMultiple<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
    {
        var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator();
        return enumerator.MoveNext() && enumerator.MoveNext();
    }
}

Using IsMultiple() in the Duplicates method is faster then Count() because this does not iterate the whole collection.

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If you look at the reference source for Grouping you can see that Count() is pre computed and your solution is likely slower. –  Johnbot Mar 16 at 10:06
    
@Johnbot. You are right, in this case it is faster and the implementatation is likely to never changes... but it depends on an implementation detail of implemetation class behind IGrouping. With my implementaion, you know it will never iterate the whole collection. –  Alex Siepman Mar 16 at 16:02

Find out if an enumerable contains any duplicate :

var any = enumerable.GroupBy(x => x.Key).Any(g => g.Count() > 1);

Find out if all values in an enumerable are unique :

var unique = enumerable.GroupBy(x => x.Key).All(g => g.Count() == 1);
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