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I have a List of strings:

["String1"]
["String2"]
["String1"]
["String3"]
["String2"]
["String1"]

That I need to search and find the indexes of "String1" in the List and also count how many times "String1" occurred. I've reviewed this answer but I'm new to this type of coding in C# and I'm unclear how to extract the index values, so if you could explain how to use the solution, that'd be great!

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marked as duplicate by Daniel A. White, MarcinJuraszek, Soner Gönül, Sahil Mittal, michielvoo Sep 1 '13 at 8:06

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
@Daniel. The OP actually mentions that question in his own question, so apparently needs more detail than it provided. –  Andy Brown Aug 31 '13 at 12:16
    
@mark - please as your questions to it over here. –  Daniel A. White Aug 31 '13 at 12:19
    
@Mark Do you really only need the indicies for "String1", or do you want the indicies for all strings? If you only care about "String1" then there's a much simpler solution using a basic loop. –  Matthew Watson Aug 31 '13 at 12:54

3 Answers 3

The code from the other answer, which I will duplicate here for reference,

var duplicates = data
  .Select((t,i) => new { Index = i, Text = t })
  .GroupBy(g => g.Text)
  .Where(g => g.Count() > 1);

Returns an IEnumerable of IGrouping, which is itself an IEnumerable of an anonymous type. You can get the indexes out of the result like this:

foreach(var group in duplicates)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Duplicates of {0}:", group.Key)
    foreach(var x in group)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("- Index {0}:", x.Index)
    }
}

However, if all you want to do is get a list of indexes, you can use the SelectMany extension method:

var duplicateIndexes = data
  .Select((t,i) => new { Index = i, Text = t })
  .GroupBy(g => g.Text)
  .Where(g => g.Count() > 1)
  .SelectMany(g => g, (g, x) => x.Index);

This will return an IEnumerable of int's.

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1  
Why the downvote? If there is something wrong in my answer, I'd be happy to correct it. –  p.s.w.g Aug 31 '13 at 12:20
    
its plagiarism from the other question. –  Daniel A. White Aug 31 '13 at 12:29
3  
@DanielA.White OP's question was specifically about trying to get a better understanding about that code. I copied it here for better context (since OP didn't included it in the actual question). That seems fairly reasonable to me, since I did provide a explanation which addressed OP's specific question. Would you prefer that I simply link to the answer (which might be edited in the future, ruining this context), or perhaps edit the question to contain the code OP is confused about? –  p.s.w.g Aug 31 '13 at 12:37

Start with understanding the code from the answer (see my comments below):

// Produce an enumeration of Index/Text pairs
var duplicates = data
    // First, add the index to the value by using Select with an anonymous type
    .Select((t,i) => new { Index = i, Text = t })
    // Next, group the results by the content of the string
    .GroupBy(g => g.Text)
    // Finally, keep only groups with more than one item.
    .Where(g => g.Count() > 1);

Let's modify it to suit our purposes:

// Produce an enumeration of Indexes of "String1"
var allString1Indexes = data
    // First, add the index to the value by using Select with an anonymous type
    .Select((t,i) => new { Index = i, Text = t })
    // Keep only the "String1" items
    .Where(p => p.Text == "String1")
    // Use only indexes
    .Select(p => p.Index);

You can iterate the result now, and print all indexes of "String1":

foreach (var i in allString1Indexes) {
    Console.WriteLine("String1 is found at index {0}", i);
}
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You can use ToDictionary method to get Dictionary<string, List<int>>:

var duplicated = data.Select((x, i) => new { i, x })
                     .GroupBy(x => x.x)
                     .Where(g => g.Count() > 1)
                     .ToDictionary(g => g.Key, g => g.Select(x => x.i).ToList());

Under every Key there is a list of indexes where the string actually occurs in source list.

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