Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If I create a slice with (e.g.)

mySlice := make([]int, 5, 10)

then I suppose an array of type [10]int is created silently, and I receive a slice that "sees" the first 5 ints.

(Right? The Go docs don't quite phrase it this way, but since a slice must always have an underlying array somewhere, I don't see how it could be any other way.)

So I believe the above is shorthand for:

var myArray [10]int
mySlice := myArray[0:5]

But when I use the first method, I don't have a handle to the array. Is there any way to obtain it from the slice?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Without using unsafe pointer tricks, there's no way how to get an array from a slice.

share|improve this answer
    
OK, so a [10]int array is created when I use make([]int,5,10), I just can't get to it. Correct? So in case I do need a handle to the underlying array somewhere, the "long form" way of creating the array explicitly and then slicing it would be the only approach? –  Jimmy Jam Aug 31 '13 at 16:51
    
The "long form" allows to keep an instance of the underlying array reachable. One has to be careful not to use append with the slice-derived-from-array as the "connection" between the slice and its "original" backing array can become broken. I don't know what are you trying to do, but it might be the case you're on the wrong path if you're attempting to solve this problem. I cannot recall a similar approach being used or discussed before. –  zzzz Aug 31 '13 at 17:13
    
I'm just trying to fully understand Go's arrays and slices, coming from a C/C++/D background. You mention there is the possibility of breaking the connection between the slice and its original. That sounds like the same behavior as D, and I was hoping Go didn't have this problem. I guess append will silently create a new underlying array if the capacity of the original slice (which is the length of the original array) is exceeded? –  Jimmy Jam Aug 31 '13 at 18:08
    
@JimmyJam: yes. –  newacct Aug 31 '13 at 20:34

I'm not sure what kind of "handle" you want, but arrays are passed by value in Go. So if you have a function that takes an array as a parameter, you can just copy the data from the slice into an array, and pass the array. The array would be copied anyway when you passed it to the function.

If it's your own code that wants to work with the array, it can do everything with the slice that it would with the array.

The only thing you can't do without unsafe is to create a pointer to the array—but you can do that easily with unsafe:

arrayPtr := (*[10]int)(unsafe.Pointer(&mySlice[0]))
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.