Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using the following HTML and CSS code to try and create a section with 3 divs inside of it, the problem is that even though the divs are inside the section tag, in the web page they appear outside and below the section element?

HTML code

<section id="content">
<div class="homebox">
<h3>Who I am</h3>
<p>Here is some text  Here is some text  Here is some text  Here is some text  </p>
</div>

<div class="homebox">
<h3>What I do</h3>
<p> Here is some text  Here is some text  Here is some text  Here is some text  Here is some text  Here is some text   </p> 
</div>

<div class="homebox">
<h3>Where I do it</h3>
<p> Here is some text  Here is some text  Here is some text  Here is some text  Here is some text  Here is some text  </p>
</div>

</section>

Here is the CSS code I'm using

#content {
    color:#FFF;
    margin-top: 20px;
    width: 100%;
    padding-left: 20px;
}

#content h3 {
    color:#FFF;
    font-size: 40px;
    font-family: Impact, Arial, sans-serif;
    margin:0;
    font-weight: 100;
}

#content > .homebox {
    float:left;
    width: 28%;
    padding: 0px 20px 20px; /* Top 0 padding, left and right 20px, bottom 20px padding */
    margin-right: 18px;
    text-align:center;
    border-radius:40px;
    background: #818181;
    background: -moz-radial-gradient(center, ellipse cover,  rgba(234,211,0,0.6) 0%, rgba(255,255,255,0) 100%); /* FF3.6+ */
    background: -webkit-gradient(radial, center center, 0px, center center, 100%, color-stop(0%,rgba(234,211,0,0.6)), color-stop(63%,rgba(255,255,255,0.22)), color-stop(100%,rgba(255,255,255,0))); /* Chrome,Safari4+ */
    background: -webkit-radial-gradient(center, ellipse cover,  rgba(234,211,0,0.6) 0%,rgba(255,255,255,0.22) 63%,rgba(255,255,255,0) 100%); /* Chrome10+,Safari5.1+ */
    background: -o-radial-gradient(center, ellipse cover,  rgba(234,211,0,0.6) 0%,rgba(255,255,255,0.22) 63%,rgba(255,255,255,0) 100%); /* Opera 12+ */
    background: -ms-radial-gradient(center, ellipse cover,  rgba(234,211,0,0.6) 0%,rgba(255,255,255,0.22) 63%,rgba(255,255,255,0) 100%); /* IE10+ */
    background: radial-gradient(ellipse at center,  rgba(234,211,0,0.6) 0%,rgba(255,255,255,0.22) 63%,rgba(255,255,255,0) 100%); /* W3C */
    filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.gradient( startColorstr='#99ead300', endColorstr='#00ffffff',GradientType=1 ); /* IE6-9 fallback on horizontal gradient */
}

.homebox > p {
    margin: 0px;
    color: #FFF;
    font-family: Trebuchet MS, Arial, sans-serif;
}
share|improve this question
1  
One solution is to just add overflow: hidden; to the <section> element; floats are taken out of the normal flow - jsfiddle.net/ZhZWN –  Adrift Aug 31 '13 at 15:44
    
I am a bit curious, without a background color or border on #content, you might not notice the problem unless you have other content after the header. –  Marc Audet Aug 31 '13 at 15:48
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need to either clear your floats or trigger a new block formatting context:

#content {
    color:#FFF;
    margin-top: 20px;
    width: 100%;
    padding-left: 20px;
    overflow: auto; /* Will cause all child floats to be enclosed. */
}

How This Works - Block Formatting Contexts

By adding the overflow: auto property to a block element, the CSS engine triggers a new block formatting context. This means that all the content with the block will be formatted within the block and disregard any elements outside of the block. If you have floats, then the floats pay attention to the edges of the parent element and are not affected by any content outside of the parent.

Reference: http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS2/visuren.html#block-formatting

share|improve this answer
    
Cheers, it worked. I don't really know how though, how does adding the overflow make it work? –  Harry12345 Aug 31 '13 at 15:48
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.