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This is my sample program.

class parent
{

    void display(int i)
    {
        System.out.println("parent");
    }

}

class child extends parent
{

    void display(byte i)  //Line 0
    {

        System.out.println("child");
        return;
    }

}

class impl
{

    public static void main(String...args)
    {

        parent p = new parent();
        p.display(5); //Line 1
        child c = new child();
        c.display(3); //Line 2

    }

}

This is my output.

varun@\:~/Desktop/JavaFiles$ java impl
parent
parent

I understand Line 1 calls the display() method from the parent and outputs "parent" which is expected.

But I don’t understand why Line 2 calls the display() from the parent instead of the child even though I am not using polymorphic initialization (just a regular initialization of the child class is what I did).

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5 Answers 5

The display(byte) method in child does not override the display(int) method in parent. And since 3 is, by default, an int, you call the display method in parent.

Try c.display((byte)3)

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Nice explanation..especially the part about casting (byte) thanks..!!! –  UnderDog Aug 31 '13 at 15:48

The method you've declared in the child class does not override the method in the parent class; one takes an int argument while the other takes a byte (you can test this by adding @Override to the child class method; a compilation error will occur). In your main method, you are calling display() by passing an int argument, hence the method of the parent class is called.

If you want to invoke display() as declared in the child class, you'll need to explicitly pass a byte argument:

c.display((byte)3);
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What inheritence??? The child display takes a byte, you are passing an int so the parent display is called.

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You are overloading the display() in Child class, not Overriding.

Overriding rules

1 Arguments Must not change
2 Return type Can't change except for covariant (subtype) returns
3 Exceptions Can reduce/eliminate. Must not throw new/broader checked exceptions
3 Access Must not be more restrictive. Can be less restrictive.
4 Invocation Which method to call is based on object type, at runtime time

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The parameter 3 is considered as an int, not a byte type.

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