Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was just wondering if there is a more cpu efficient way of writing the following loop as I need to speed my program up?

for char in data:
    if char in self.key:
        match += chr(self.key.index(char))

Thanks in advance for any help.

share|improve this question
    
What is self.key, a list? –  Martijn Pieters Aug 31 '13 at 16:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Replace self.key with a dictionary; it is the membership testing against a list, as well as the .index() calls that are costing you the most performance; both require scans across the list.

Use str.join() to concatenate a series of characters; that builds one new string object instead of N new objects:

keys = {char: chr(i) for i, char in enumerate(self.key)}
match = ''.join([keys[char] for char in data if char in keys])

Dictionary membership tests and lookups are O(1) constant cost; by building the dictionary with char(..) values you can avoid multiple chr() calls per value; depending on how many values are re-used it could be faster to use char: i instead and move the chr() call to the list comprehension.

share|improve this answer
    
Just a little confused: why wouldn't match = ''.join(keys[char] for char in data if char in keys) work? Forgive me if it is something stupid I'm missing. –  iCodez Aug 31 '13 at 16:44
    
@iCodez: See list comprehension without [ ], Python for the reason why; due to how str.join() operates a list comp is more efficient than a generator expression. –  Martijn Pieters Aug 31 '13 at 16:51
    
Thanks to everyone who responded. Lots of choices, went with Martijn's answer as it had the most votes. No offence to all those who provided other great alternatives as well. It really was a lot quicker than my attempt. Thanks again Clinton. –  Clinton Moffat Aug 31 '13 at 16:58

Yes, use a dictionary instead of a list. index operation is slow (it's O(log(N)) as is the check if the element is in the list, while dictionary access is O(1))

self.map = dict(zip(self.key, range(len(self.key)))
for char in data:
     if char in self.map:
        match += chr(self.map[char])

Also change the constant adding to the string to just one string concatenation using join and a generator expression inside (avoid list creation):

result = ''.join(chr(self.map[char]) for char in data if char in self.map)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks to everyone who responded. Lots of choices, went with Martijn's answer as it had the most votes. No offence to all those who provided other great alternatives as well. It really was a lot quicker than my attempt. Thanks again Clinton. –  Clinton Moffat Aug 31 '13 at 16:59
    
@ViktorKerkez : Using a list comprehension is actually faster in the case of join(...). –  Sukrit Kalra Aug 31 '13 at 17:13
match = ''.join(char for char in data if char in self.key)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks to everyone who responded. Lots of choices, went with Martijn's answer as it had the most votes. No offence to all those who provided other great alternatives as well. It really was a lot quicker than my attempt. Thanks again Clinton. –  Clinton Moffat Aug 31 '13 at 16:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.