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According to String#intern(), intern method is supposed to return the String from the String pool if the String is found in String pool, otherwise a new string object will be added in String pool and the reference of this String is returned.

So i tried this:

String s1 = "Rakesh";
String s2 = "Rakesh";
String s3 = "Rakesh".intern();

if ( s1 == s2 ){
    System.out.println("s1 and s2 are same");  // 1.
}

if ( s1 == s3 ){
    System.out.println("s1 and s3 are same" );  // 2.
}

I was expecting that s1 and s3 are same will be printed as s3 is interned, and s1 and s2 are same will not be printed. But the result is: both lines are printed. So that means, by default String constants are interned. But if it is so, then why do we need the intern method? In other words when should we use this method?

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5  
The Javadoc you linked also states "All literal strings and string-valued constant expressions are interned." –  Jorn Dec 6 '09 at 11:54
1  
    
not an exact duplicate.. –  Bozho Dec 6 '09 at 11:59
    
@Jorn: that's right. So why do we have intern as public method. Shouldn't we have intern as private method, so that nobody could have access to it. Or is there any purpose of this method? –  Rakesh Juyal Dec 6 '09 at 12:05
1  
@RakeshJuyal: The intern method is defined on a string type which can be string literals or variables. How would you intern a variable if the method was private? –  Bobby Alexander Aug 22 '13 at 5:17

9 Answers 9

up vote 74 down vote accepted

Java automatically interns String literals. This means that in many cases, the == operator appears to work for Strings in the same way that it does for ints or other primitive values.

Since interning is automatic for String literals, the intern() method is to be used on Strings constructed with new String()

Using your example:

String s1 = "Rakesh";
String s2 = "Rakesh";
String s3 = "Rakesh".intern();
String s4 = new String("Rakesh");
String s5 = new String("Rakesh").intern();

if ( s1 == s2 ){
    System.out.println("s1 and s2 are same");  // 1.
}

if ( s1 == s3 ){
    System.out.println("s1 and s3 are same" );  // 2.
}

if ( s1 == s4 ){
    System.out.println("s1 and s4 are same" );  // 3.
}

if ( s1 == s5 ){
    System.out.println("s1 and s5 are same" );  // 4.
}

will return:

s1 and s2 are same
s1 and s3 are same
s1 and s5 are same

Refer to JavaTechniques "String Equality and Interning" for more information.

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I'm assuming that Java automatically interns String literals for optimization purposes. It can do this safely only because Strings are immutable, correct? –  styfle Jan 4 '12 at 0:06
    
New to Java (I am from the C#.NET world) and I sometimes see in a Java legacy project "".intern() so if I understand it correctly that this is "nonsense" also for empty strings. –  hfrmobile Apr 11 '13 at 11:46
3  
@Miguel Nice explanation , My question is how may object created here in you example . Here is My Assumption : String s1 = "Rakesh"; first OB1 String s4 = new String("Rakesh"); Second OB2 So rest of (s2,s3,s5) reference same object (OB1) created in 'string Pool' So can i say that .intern() method used for prevent to create new object if same string available in string pool If my assumption is wrong so give me direction . –  U2Answer Jul 26 '13 at 5:49
1  
The JavaTechniques link is broken –  SJuan76 Mar 10 at 7:47
    
This makes sense!!! –  Rakesh Patil Sep 1 at 17:00

On a recent project, some huge data structures were set up with data that was read in from a database (and hence not String constants/literals) but with a huge amount of duplication. It was a banking application, and things like the names of a modest set (maybe 100 or 200) corporations appeared all over the place. The data structures were already large, and if all those corp names had been unique objects they would have overflowed memory. Instead, all the data structures had references to the same 100 or 200 String objects, thus saving lots of space.

Another small advantage of interned Strings is that == can be used (successfully!) to compare Strings if all involved strings are guaranteed to be interned. Apart from the leaner syntax, this is also a performance enhancement. But as others have pointed out, doing this harbors a great risk of introducing programming errors, so this should be done only as a desparate measure of last resort.

The downside is that interning a String takes more time than simply throwing it on the heap, and that the space for interned Strings may be limited, depending on the Java implementation. It's best done when you're dealing with a known reasonable number of Strings with many duplications.

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@The downside is that interning a String takes more time than simply throwing it on the heap, and that the space for interned Strings may be limited even if you don't use intern method for String constant it will be interned automatically. –  Rakesh Juyal Dec 6 '09 at 12:08
    
@Rakesh: There are not that many String constants in any given class usually, so it is not a problem of space/time with constants. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Dec 6 '09 at 12:13
    
Yes, Rakesh's comment doesn't apply because interning Strings is only (explicitly) done with Strings that are "generated" somehow, be it by internal manipulation or by retrieving from a database or such. With constants we don't have a choice. –  Carl Smotricz Dec 6 '09 at 12:24
    
+1. I think this is a good example of when interning makes sense. I don't agree on == for strings though. –  Alexander Pogrebnyak Dec 6 '09 at 12:34
    
@Carl. I've expanded my answer to show evils of == –  Alexander Pogrebnyak Dec 6 '09 at 12:52

I want to add my 2 cents on using == with interned strings.

The first thing String.equals does is this==object.

So although there is some miniscule performance gain ( you are not calling a method), from the maintainer point of view using == is a nightmare, because some interned strings have a tendency to become non-interned.

So I suggest not to rely on special case of == for interned strings, but always use equals as Gosling intended.

EDIT: interned becoming non-interned:

V1.0
public class MyClass
{
  private String reference_val;

  ...

  private boolean hasReferenceVal ( final String[] strings )
  {
    for ( String s : strings )
    {
      if ( s == reference_val )
      {
        return true;
      }
    }

    return false;
  }

  private void makeCall ( )
  {
     final String[] interned_strings =  { ... init with interned values ... };

     if ( hasReference( interned_strings ) )
     {
        ...
     }
  }
}

In version 2.0 maintainer decided to make hasReferenceVal public, without going into much detail that it expects an array of interned strings.

V2.0
public class MyClass
{
  private String reference_val;

  ...

  public boolean hasReferenceVal ( final String[] strings )
  {
    for ( String s : strings )
    {
      if ( s == reference_val )
      {
        return true;
      }
    }

    return false;
  }

  private void makeCall ( )
  {
     final String[] interned_strings =  { ... init with interned values ... };

     if ( hasReference( interned_strings ) )
     {
        ...
     }
  }
}

Now you have a bug, that may be very hard to find, because in majority of cases array contains literal values, and sometimes a non-literal string is used. If equals were used instead of == then hasReferenceVal would have still continue to work. Once again, performance gain is miniscule, but maintenance cost is high.

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"some interned strings have a tendency to become non-interned." wow, that would be... strange. Can you cite a reference, please? –  Carl Smotricz Dec 6 '09 at 12:26
    
OK, I thought you were referring to Strings actually wandering out of the intern pool and onto the heap thanks to magic in the JVM. What you're saying is that == makes certain classes of programmer errors more likely. –  Carl Smotricz Dec 6 '09 at 12:57
    
"So I suggest not to rely on special case of == for interned strings, but always use equals as Gosling intended." Do you have a direct quote or comment from Gosling stating this? If that's the case why did he even bother putting intern() and the use of == in the language? –  user1673742 Sep 15 '12 at 17:44
    
intern is not good for direct comparion (==), even though it works if both strings are interned. it is great to lower total memory used : when the same string is used in more than 1 place. –  tgkprog Apr 30 '13 at 20:54

String literals and constants are intenred by default. That is, "foo" == "foo" (declared by the String literals), but new String("foo") != new String("foo").

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2  
So, the question is when should we use intern, –  Rakesh Juyal Dec 6 '09 at 12:03
    
that was pointed to stackoverflow.com/questions/1833581/when-to-use-intern, and a number of other questions, some of them from yesterday. –  Bozho Dec 6 '09 at 12:24

Interned Strings avoid duplicate Strings. Interning saves RAM at the expense of more CPU time to detect and replace duplicate Strings. There is only one copy of each String that has been interned, no matter how many references point to it. Since Strings are immutable, if two different methods incidentally use the same String, they can share a copy of the same String. The process of converting duplicated Strings to shared ones is called interning.String.intern() gives you the address of the canonical master String. You can compare interned Strings with simple == (which compares pointers) instead of equals which compares the characters of the String one by one. Because Strings are immutable, the intern process is free to further save space, for example, by not creating a separate String literal for "pot" when it exists as a substring of some other literal such as "hippopotamus".

To see more http://mindprod.com/jgloss/interned.html

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/String_interning

string interning is a method of storing only one copy of each distinct string value, which must be immutable. Interning strings makes some string processing tasks more time- or space-efficient at the cost of requiring more time when the string is created or interned. The distinct values are stored in a string intern pool.

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Why can't string literals be used in the places where intern is requried to use? String literal usage by default will reuse the existing string literals. So why do we need to create new String("something).intern() instead of just assigning "something" ?

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1  
You published a question as an answear. Just open a new question.. You can link to this question if you like. –  Franz Ebner Oct 9 '13 at 6:23
String s1 = "Anish";
        String s2 = "Anish";

        String s3 = new String("Anish");

        /*
         * When the intern method is invoked, if the pool already contains a
         * string equal to this String object as determined by the
         * method, then the string from the pool is
         * returned. Otherwise, this String object is added to the
         * pool and a reference to this String object is returned.
         */
        String s4 = new String("Anish").intern();
        if (s1 == s2) {
            System.out.println("s1 and s2 are same");
        }

        if (s1 == s3) {
            System.out.println("s1 and s3 are same");
        }

        if (s1 == s4) {
            System.out.println("s1 and s4 are same");
        }

OUTPUT

s1 and s2 are same
s1 and s4 are same
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you should make out two period time which are compile time and runtime time.for example:

//example 1 
"test" == "test" // --> true 
"test" == "te" + "st" // --> true

//example 2 
"test" == "!test".substring(1) // --> false
"test" == "!test".substring(1).intern() // --> true

in the one hand,in the example 1,we find the results are all return true,because in the compile time,the jvm will put the "test" to the pool of literal strings,if the jvm find "test" exists,then it will use the exists one,in example 1,the "test" strings are all point to the same memory address,so the example 1 will return true. in the other hand,in the example 2,the method of substring() execute in the runtime time, in the case of "test" == "!test".substring(1),the pool will create two string object,"test" and "!test",so they are different reference objects,so this case will return false,in the case of "test" == "!test".substring(1).intern(),the method of intern() will put the ""!test".substring(1)" to the pool of literal strings,so in this case,they are same reference objects,so will return true.

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