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I'm looking for a way for me to get the folder name which is located on (for example) http://example.com/download/"foldername here"

The reason for this is because I have a c# program which always downloads a .zip if you don't allready have it, but currently it won't download a new version.

Example: Currently it downloads from http://example.com/download/1.0/file.zip, if you allready have the folder it checks for, it won't download it, but if you do have that folder, it won't download from http://example.com/download/2.0/file.zip, which contains the new version. I have made a file which contains the current version, but how can I get my program to check that file against the folder in which the newest version resides?

Edit: I reworked my code so it downloads a version.txt file first and reads it contents, which contains the latest version of the download.

Code:

if (radUseFile.Checked)
{
//get latest version on website
WebClient modver = new WebClient();
modver.UseDefaultCredentials = true;
modver.DownloadFile("http://www.example.com/download/version.txt", tempdir _
+ "version.txt");
using (StreamReader ver = new StreamReader(tempdir + "version.txt"))
{
    siteversion = ver.ReadToEnd();
}
File.Delete(tempdir + "version.txt");
if (Directory.Exists(folder))
{
    if (File.Exists(folder + "\\version.txt"))
    {
        using (StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(folder + "\\version.txt"))
        {
            latestversion = sr.ReadToEnd();
        }
        if (latestversion != siteversion)
        {
            uptodate = false;
        }
        else
        {
            uptodate = true;
        }
    }
}
else
{
    uptodate = false;
}
if (!uptodate)
{
    //download and extract the files
    WebClient downloader = new WebClient();
    label4.Text = "Downloading full client. May take a while";
    this.Update();
    downloader.UseDefaultCredentials = true;
    downloader.DownloadFile("http://www.example.com/download" + siteversion _
+ "/zipfile.zip", templocation + "zipfile.zip");

    label4.Text = "Extracting...";
    Shell32.Shell sc = new Shell32.Shell();
    Directory.CreateDirectory(tempdir);
    Shell32.Folder output = sc.NameSpace(tempdir);
    Shell32.Folder input = sc.NameSpace(tempdir + "zipfile.zip");
    output.CopyHere(input.Items(), 4);

    label4.Text = "Cleaning up...";
    File.Delete(tempdir + "zipfile.zip");

    new Microsoft.VisualBasic.Devices.Computer().FileSystem.CopyDirectory(tempdir,_
folderlocation, true);

    Directory.Delete(tempdir, true);

    uptodate = true;
}
}
else
{
uptodate = true;
}

This works for now, but I'm pretty sure this code can be improved, or the entire method as to how it takes the latest version

share|improve this question
2  
Url paths doesn't have to map to a phsical path. For ex http://foo.bar/download/mostrecent/ can map to 3.0 today, but 4.0 tomorrow. –  I4V Aug 31 '13 at 21:07
    
Do you want to get the list of all 'folders' in http://foo.bar/download/ ? –  Dmitry Dovgopoly Aug 31 '13 at 21:54
    
@I4V I was hoping for something like that, although how can I get that to work exactly? By making an extra folder which redirects to the latest version? –  Yorrick Sep 1 '13 at 11:44
    
@DmitryDovgopoly, I guess that would be a future possibility so people will be able to select what version they want, but for now I just want it to find the latest version –  Yorrick Sep 1 '13 at 11:45
    
In this case Andrew's answer is the only option. You can not find the folder name if you don't have it written somewhere. It can be a text file or html page. –  Dmitry Dovgopoly Sep 1 '13 at 14:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You could have a text file, containing the latest version number and where to download it from, in a permanent location, say http://example.com/download/latestversion.txt. Then use WebClient.DownloadString to retrieve that file, and take the appropriate action depending on the content of the file.

share|improve this answer
    
That is an option, but isn't that taking the long way around? I'm pretty sure there's an easier way which doesn't require an extra temp download. –  Yorrick Sep 1 '13 at 11:48

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