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I have been trying to use this c++ program to sort 5 names alphabetically:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstring>
#include <conio.h>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
char names[5][100];
int x,y,z;

char exchange[100];

cout << "Enter five names...\n";

for(x=1;x<=5;x++)
{
    cout << x << ". ";
    cin >> names[x-1];
}
getch();

for(x=0;x<=5-2;x++)
{
    for(y=0;y<=5-2;y++)
    {
        for(z=0;z<=99;z++)
        {
            if(int(names[y][z])>int(names[y+1][z]))
            {   
                strcpy(exchange,names[y]);
                strcpy(names[y],names[y+1]);
                strcpy(names[y+1],exchange);
                break;
            }
        }   
    }
}   

for(x=0;x<=5-1;x++)
    cout << names[x];

return 0;
}

If I enter Earl, Don, Chris, Bill, and Andy respectively, I get this:

AndyEarlDonChrisBill

Could someone please tell me whats wrong with my program?

share|improve this question
1  
Look up strcmp. –  Greg Hewgill Aug 31 '13 at 21:46
4  
Have you considered using std::string and its std::string::compare function? –  jeffamaphone Aug 31 '13 at 21:47
    
@GregHewgill More like look up std::string –  Borgleader Aug 31 '13 at 21:48
6  
Bluntly, your program bears no obvious relationship to any rational string sorting algorithm. –  David Schwartz Aug 31 '13 at 21:48
2  
Your code is funny (besides being overly complex): it includes conio.h which is not standard, and it doesn't seem to get used in your code; it uses cstring library, which is a fairly low-level thing. If you are trying to learn C++ (and not C) it would be easier to learn C++ string library features (<string> with the related std::string class, as others mentioned). Unless you have a strong reason to use arrays, it is better to use standard containers instead (e.g. std::vector in <vector>). Did you write all this code yourself or did you try to adapt something found on the internet? –  Lorenzo Donati Aug 31 '13 at 22:03

3 Answers 3

You could use std::set or std::multiset (if you will allow repeated items) of strings, and it will keep the items sorted automatically (you could even change the sorting criteria if you want).

#include <iostream>
#include <set>
#include <algorithm>

void print(const std::string& item)
{
    std::cout << item << std::endl;
}

int main()
{
    std::set<std::string> sortedItems;

    for(int i = 1; i <= 5; ++i)
    {
        std::string name;
        std::cout << i << ". ";
        std::cin >> name;

        sortedItems.insert(name);
    }

    std::for_each(sortedItems.begin(), sortedItems.end(), &print);
    return 0;
}

input:

  1. Gerardo
  2. Carlos
  3. Kamilo
  4. Angel
  5. Bosco

output:

Angel
Bosco
Carlos
Gerardo
Kamilo
share|improve this answer

Your code implements a single-pass of bubble sort. Essentially missing the 'repeat until no changes are made to the array' loop around the outside.

share|improve this answer
    
are there any other sorting types that might be helpful? –  JayKay Aug 31 '13 at 22:47
    
Depends upon your objective. If the goal is to get those values sorted, then bubble sort is good enough until other factors make it not worthwhile. For a small set of values like five strings the time spent sorting is a miniscule fraction of the total program runtime so bubble sort is just fine. –  caskey Aug 31 '13 at 22:52

The code does not take care when the names are already in order. Add the following

else if(int(names[y][z])<int(names[y+1][z]))
            break;  

To the if statement.

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