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Let's say I have a set of flags and a class like this:

/// <summary>Options controlling a search for files.</summary>
enum class FindFilesOptions : unsigned char
{
    LocalSearch = 0,
    RecursiveSearch = 1,
    IncludeDotDirectories = 2
};

class FindFiles : boost::noncopyable
{
    /* omitted */
public:
    FindFiles(std::wstring const& pattern, FindFilesOptions options);
    /* omitted */
}

and I want a caller to be able to select more than one option:

FindFiles handle(Append(basicRootPath, L"*"),
    FindFilesOptions::RecursiveSearch | FindFilesOptions::IncludeDotDirectories);

Is it possible to support this in a strongly-typed way with C++11 enum class, or do I have to revert to untyped enumerations?

(I know the caller could static_cast to the underlying type and static_cast back, but I don't want the caller to have to do that)

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There's also std::bitset to pass flags. –  dyp Sep 1 '13 at 0:26
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5 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

It is certainly possible to use enum classes for bitmaps. It is, unfortunately, a bit painful to do so: You need to define the necessary bit operations on your type. Below is an example how this could look like. It would be nice if the enum classes could derive from some other type which could live in a suitable namespace defining the necessary operator boilerplate code.

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

enum class bitmap: unsigned char
{
    a = 0x01,
    b = 0x02,
    c = 0x04
};

bitmap operator& (bitmap x, bitmap y)
{
    typedef std::underlying_type<bitmap>::type uchar;
    return bitmap(uchar(x) & uchar(y));
}

bitmap operator| (bitmap x, bitmap y)
{
    typedef std::underlying_type<bitmap>::type uchar;
    return bitmap(uchar(x) | uchar(y));
}

bitmap operator^ (bitmap x, bitmap y)
{
    typedef std::underlying_type<bitmap>::type uchar;
    return bitmap(uchar(x) ^ uchar(y));
}

bool test(bitmap x)
{
    return std::underlying_type<bitmap>::type(x);
}

int main()
{
    bitmap v = bitmap::a | bitmap::b;
    if (test(v & bitmap::a)) {
        std::cout << "a ";
    }
    if (test(v & bitmap::b)) {
        std::cout << "b ";
    }
    if (test(v & bitmap::c)) {
        std::cout << "c ";
    }
    std::cout << '\n';
}
share|improve this answer
    
Actually, I don't think that is painful at all -- I only want to allow callers to OR them together so all I'd need would be operator|. +1 –  Billy ONeal Aug 31 '13 at 23:57
1  
Why not use std::underlying_type<bitmap>::type instead of repeating it in the typedef? –  dyp Sep 1 '13 at 0:17
1  
BTW, the correct term is "bitfield", not "bitmap". A bitmap, particularly in image circles, is something quite different. –  Nicol Bolas Sep 1 '13 at 0:36
1  
@DyP: Maybe I should settle with defining the enum in a suitable location and using a typedef to make it accessible where it is actually needed. Here is a complete example. –  Dietmar Kühl Sep 1 '13 at 1:31
2  
@SheaLevy Well there's no enumerator with the value 0x03, but 0x03 is a "valid" value for a variable of type bitmap, see stackoverflow.com/q/18195312/420683 –  dyp Feb 22 at 17:14
show 12 more comments

Templates play well with enum class so you can define sets of operators that work on sets of similar enumeration types. The key is to use a traits template to specify what interface(s) each enumeration conforms/subscribes to.

As a start:

enum class mood_flag {
    jumpy,
    happy,
    upset,
    count // size of enumeration
};

template<>
struct enum_traits< mood_flag > {
    static constexpr bool bit_index = true;
};

template< typename t >
struct flag_bits : std::bitset< static_cast< int >( t::count ) > {
    flag_bits( t bit ) // implicit
        : flag_bits::bitset( 1 << static_cast< int >( bit ) ) {}

    // Should be explicit but I'm lazy to type:
    flag_bits( typename flag_bits::bitset set )
        : flag_bits::bitset( set ) {}
};

template< typename e >
typename std::enable_if< enum_traits< e >::bit_index,
    flag_bits< e > >::type
operator | ( flag_bits< e > set, e next )
    { return set | flag_bits< e >( next ); }

template< typename e >
typename std::enable_if< enum_traits< e >::bit_index,
    flag_bits< e > >::type
operator | ( e first, e next )
    { return flag_bits< e >( first ) | next; }

http://ideone.com/kJ271Z

GCC 4.9 reported that some implicit member functions were constexpr while I was getting this to compile, so the templates should probably be so as well.

This should probably also have a free function to_scalar or something which returns an unsigned integer type given either an individual flag or a flag_bits set.

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How about defining FindFiles so that it takes std::initializer_list of FindFilesOptions.

void FindFiles(std::wstring const& pattern, std::initializer_list<FindFilesOptions> options)
{
  auto has_option = [&](FindFilesOptions const option)
  {
    return std::find(std::begin(options), std::end(options), option) != std::end(options);
  };

  if (has_option(FindFilesOptions::LocalSearch))
  {
    // ...
  }

  if (has_option(FindFilesOptions::RecursiveSearch))
  {
    // ...
  }

  if (has_option(FindFilesOptions::IncludeDotDirectories))
  {
    // ...
  }
}

Then you could call it like so:

FindFiles({}, {FindFilesOptions::RecursiveSearch, FindFilesOptions::IncludeDotDirectories});
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. Now if the compiler I was using only supported initializer_list. +1 –  Billy ONeal Sep 1 '13 at 0:50
    
Then, just use std::vector. –  Natok Sep 1 '13 at 0:53
    
That makes the caller unnecessarily complex. –  Billy ONeal Sep 1 '13 at 0:53
    
@BillyONeal Instead of an initializer_list, maybe a function template with a parameter pack? –  dyp Sep 1 '13 at 0:57
2  
@Natok The ctor of vector that allows this... is taking an initializer_list. Same problem probably. –  dyp Sep 1 '13 at 1:01
show 2 more comments

The problem is not the explicit enum type but the class scope.

With C++11, enum as compile time constant loose a lot of interest compared to a bunch of constexpr when you need operate on the value ( bitwise operation, incrementation, etc)

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1  
Making the values constexprs would allow someone to pass in any old integral type to FindFiles, which I do not want to allow. –  Billy ONeal Aug 31 '13 at 23:53
    
I was a bit fast, the idea is to write a small template wrapper over a scalar type, taking a second class type as a tag ( like iterator_category ) to prevent mix of two sets of constants. –  galop1n Sep 1 '13 at 0:10
    
That would require me to make FindFiles::FindFiles(std::wstring const&, options) into a template. –  Billy ONeal Sep 1 '13 at 0:49
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If you don't care about performance, change your options to set<FindFilesOptions>!

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That makes the caller overly complicated. –  Billy ONeal Sep 1 '13 at 0:50
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