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I try to follow this article: http://flipcode.com/archives/How%5FTo%5FFind%5FMemory%5FLeaks.shtml

to overload my new and delete functions in order to track memory leaks.

however - if i try to compile, I get a

C2365: "operator new": redefinition; previous definition was a "function"

in the file xdebug

xdebug gets included in xlocale - however, i can't find where my project is including xlocale

I'm using MFC for multithreading in my project.

Can someone tell me how i can get my memory leak tracking to work?

Thanks!

//edit: So this is my findMemoryLeak.h which i include in the end of stdafx.h

#ifndef _FINDMEMORYLEAK_H
#define _FINDMEMORYLEAK_H

#include <list>
using namespace std;

#ifdef _DEBUG

typedef struct {
	DWORD	address;
	DWORD	size;
	char	file[64];
	DWORD	line;
} ALLOC_INFO;

typedef list<ALLOC_INFO*> AllocList;

AllocList *allocList;

void AddTrack(DWORD addr,  DWORD asize,  const char *fname, DWORD lnum)
{
	ALLOC_INFO *info;

	if(!allocList) {
		allocList = new(AllocList);
	}

	info = new(ALLOC_INFO);
	info->address = addr;
	strncpy(info->file, fname, 63);
	info->line = lnum;
	info->size = asize;
	allocList->insert(allocList->begin(), info);
};

void RemoveTrack(DWORD addr)
{
	AllocList::iterator i;

	if(!allocList)
		return;
	for(i = allocList->begin(); i != allocList->end(); i++)
	{
		if((*i)->address == addr)
		{
			allocList->remove((*i));
			break;
		}
	}
};


void DumpUnfreed()
{
	AllocList::iterator i;
	DWORD totalSize = 0;
	char buf[1024];

	if(!allocList)
		return;

	for(i = allocList->begin(); i != allocList->end(); i++) {
		sprintf(buf, "%-50s:\t\tLINE %d,\t\tADDRESS %d\t%d unfreed\n",
			(*i)->file, (*i)->line, (*i)->address, (*i)->size);
		OutputDebugString(buf);
		totalSize += (*i)->size;
	}
	sprintf(buf, "-----------------------------------------------------------\n");
	OutputDebugString(buf);
	sprintf(buf, "Total Unfreed: %d bytes\n", totalSize);
	OutputDebugString(buf);
};


inline void * __cdecl operator new(unsigned int size, const char *file, int line)
{
	void *ptr = (void *)malloc(size);
	AddTrack((DWORD)ptr, size, file, line);
	return(ptr);
};

inline void __cdecl operator delete(void *p)
{
	RemoveTrack((DWORD)p);
	free(p);
};

inline void * __cdecl operator new[](unsigned int size, const char *file, int line)
{
	void *ptr = (void *)malloc(size);
	AddTrack((DWORD)ptr, size, file, line);
	return(ptr);
};

inline void __cdecl operator delete[](void *p)
{
	RemoveTrack((DWORD)p);
	free(p);
};
#endif

//make the normal new function call the new function with three parameters
#ifdef _DEBUG
#define DEBUG_NEW new(__FILE__, __LINE__)
#else
#define DEBUG_NEW new
#endif
#define new DEBUG_NEW


#endif

when I include it like this in the end of stdafx.h, i get thousands of compilererrors, most of them in either xdebug or xlocale, with the first being

C2365: "operator new": redefinition; previous definition was a "function"

in xdebug on line 32

share|improve this question
    
In a simple commandline build, this works. So I guess this is either a problem with MFC, which does exaclty what you do, or this works different in vc2010 –  Christopher Dec 6 '09 at 18:50
    
Ok i'm giving up on this. It seems it's really problematic to overwrite global new and delete in an MFC project. So i try to go with the MFC memoryDumping functions, but they're not working in my case properly either - i'll start another question for that though. thank you –  Mat Dec 6 '09 at 19:50
    
We are successfully overloading global new/delete in our MFC project... it is possible with a bit of hair loss. You need to find the object file in the MFC lib that contains the overloaded functions and then remove that object file using lib.exe, then make sure you overload new/delete in your project and define all the symbols that was defined in the object you removed from the lib. –  Emily L. Feb 13 '14 at 10:09

5 Answers 5

to find where xlocale is getting included. just changethe name of xlocale to something else. try to compile and you will see where it fails

share|improve this answer

I solved this a while ago.

What is happening is that the word new is a macro by the time you get to your overloads (granted, it didn't solve our linking problems) but try adding:

#undef new

after the last include directive in your file but before the first new overload.

edit

This happens because stdafx.h (or something else includes a file that defines DEBUG_NEW) is included before you include your memory leak detection code in some CPP file (you should be able to figure out which from the compiler errors). Thus new has been defined as a macro which causes your compiler to barf at the definition.

share|improve this answer

In Visual Studio, debug builds of programs already use a 'debug heap', so your own instrumentation is unnecessary.

Using the debug features of your platform, you could for example call _CrtDumpMemoryLeaks at the end of your program, without actually overloading everything.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi and thanks for the answer! But the overloaded methods described in the article are much better. _CrtDumpMemoryLeaks just returns true if a memory leak occurred, using the technique described in the article one should be able to identify exactly what allocations don't get freed again, in what file, on what line. is there also a _Crt function provided that does this? if not, how can I get my own overrided new/delete functions to work? –  Mat Dec 6 '09 at 14:03
    
The leak info is printed to stderr so you'll see it in visual studio. It also finds leaks that are not just caused by object news and deletes, such as you not managing win32 c-API resources and such. –  Will Dec 6 '09 at 14:17
    
Thanks again! But this is outputting hundredthousands of lines of stuff like "{692972} normal block at 0x038A1480, 12 bytes long. Data: < H > 80 14 8A 03 48 0A 8A 03 B0 86 E0 02". That's not useful for me.. all i want to know is on what line of my code I call a 'new' which does not get deleted later on –  Mat Dec 6 '09 at 14:48
    
You don't know that its a object allocated with 'new'. What you can do is set the hooks for the malloc/realloc/free; that'll catch all your allocs, but not those inside libraries you call. –  Will Dec 6 '09 at 15:06
    
On Linux, Valgrind would be just the thing! In the windows world, Purify is a commercial equivilent. –  Will Dec 6 '09 at 15:07

You are defining the very same overload that Microsoft defines for their own debugging, and running into theirs. I recommend adding an extra dummy parameter to your operator.

I also recommend debugging this not in stdafx.h before putting it there.

share|improve this answer

Trying to debug this way with std lib is not really going to work out. It won't catch all (or any) of the memory allocation. It's just one of a million reasons not to use std lib, stl, or boost.

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