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I'm caught in a mental loop, or at least a lack of understanding of how to implement the observer pattern. My intended Controller implements Observer because it's meant to, literally, observe the instances it, literally, controls.

The observed objects extend Observable because they are meant to be observed, literally, by the Controller. What do I invoke .addObserver(responseHandler); on? Another class adds an observer to the instance which, literally, implements the `Observer' interface? That can't be right.

-----edit----- responseHandler is just a generic name for some unknown Controller

As an aside, is there a naming problem in this pattern as implemented in Java, or just a lack of understanding on my part?

Here's the Controller, which has now morphed into a Controller of a Controller:

public class MetaController implements Observer {

    private final static Logger LOG = Logger.getLogger(MetaController.class.getName());
    private Printer telnetPrinter = new Printer();
    private telnetDataProcessor telnetDataProcessor = new telnetDataProcessor();
    private StringReader stringReader = new StringReader();
    private final ConcurrentLinkedQueue<Character> telnetData = new ConcurrentLinkedQueue();

    public MetaController() {
    }

    //the printer and processor each spawn their own thread so that they don't
    //block each other waiting for each other
    public void readPrintParse(final InputStream inputStream) throws SocketException, IOException {
        telnetPrinter.print(inputStream, telnetData); //populate telnetData in its own thread
        telnetDataProcessor.read(telnetData); //process telnetData in its own thread
    }

    //the StringReader just looks for particular keywords like "press enter to continue"
    //so that some phrases will trigger a response
    //commands may also be typed manually by the user (not implemented yet)
    @Override
    public void update(Observable o, Object arg) {
        //when telnetDataProcessor sends a String, send that String on to stringReader
        String cmd = stringReader.parse(null); //parse what and how?
        //send the command string back to the telnetClient
    }
}

Reading the API directly, unfortunately, is not illuminating for me.

This is an extension of an Apache WeatherTelnet example, a sort of poor-mans Netty to allow concurrent scripted telnet and live telnet responses for a simple MUD client, which requires live processing of a non-terminated telnet data stream, as well as live output and user input.

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addObserver(this)???? –  Thufir Sep 1 '13 at 2:29

3 Answers 3

Your Observable objects should addObserver(yourController);. When they change, they should then call setChanged() and then notifyObservers(). You can obviously override these methods if you need custom behavior.

For example:

MetaController controller = new MetaController();
Observable observable1 = new Weather1();
Observable observable2 = new Weather2();
Observable observable3 = new Weather3();
observable1.addObserver(controller);
observable2.addObserver(controller);
observable3.addObserver(controller);

You can also give a reference of the Observable to the Controller (Observer) if he's also the one modifying it.

There's no naming problem. The Observers need to be registered with the Observable so that it knows how to notify them.

Caution: If this is meant to be used in a multithread environment, you'll have to be careful using shared data in the controller class.

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just in terms of English, if you translate your first phrase: "Your Observable objects should addObserver(yourController);" what does that mean in natural language? I mean, where do they addObserver(yourController)? the observed objects don't have a reference to the controller. I'm trying to go with addObserver(this) for now, see how that pans out. –  Thufir Sep 1 '13 at 2:48
1  
An Observer watches an Observable. In code, this translates into an Observer registering themselves with an Observable so that they can get notifications. You can use observable.addObserver(this) if your class has an instance field reference to the Observable. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Sep 1 '13 at 2:51

The object/class that creates the objects implementing Observable should invoke their addObserver method passing the MetaController object (in its role of Observer).

I'm thinking that your MetaController could not really be an Observer from the point of view of the pattern. Perhaps it's just the owner/creator, and from here your confusion. Do you need MetaController to receive notifications from the Observables? Or a third category of objects?

I say this because as part of the question you wrote .addObserver(responseHandler); instead of .addObserver(metaController);.

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responseHandler was intended as a generic name, MetaController is the intended controller. although, as you point out, maybe it's not. –  Thufir Sep 1 '13 at 2:46

Here's what I came up with:

package telnet;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStream;
import java.net.SocketException;
import java.util.Observable;
import java.util.Observer;
import java.util.concurrent.ConcurrentLinkedQueue;
import java.util.logging.Logger;

public class Controller implements Observer {

    private final static Logger LOG = Logger.getLogger(Controller.class.getName());
    private Printer telnetPrinter = new Printer();
    private telnetDataProcessor telnetDataProcessor = new telnetDataProcessor();
    private StringReader stringReader = new StringReader();
    private final ConcurrentLinkedQueue<Character> telnetData = new ConcurrentLinkedQueue();

    public Controller() {
    }

    public void readPrintParse(final InputStream inputStream) throws SocketException, IOException {
        telnetPrinter.print(inputStream, telnetData);
        telnetPrinter.addObserver(this);
        telnetDataProcessor.read(telnetData);
        telnetDataProcessor.addObserver(this);
        stringReader.addObserver(this);
    }

    @Override
    public void update(Observable o, Object arg) {
        System.out.println("updated...");
        String s = telnetDataProcessor.getString();
    }
}
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