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After doing some reading on this link on how to use getopt(), I'm trying to get a small example.

What I want, is something like:

./prog -v      # show me prog version
./prog -f filename  # just show me the filename I entered from the command line

Here is what I wrote so far:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int
main(int argc, *argv[]) {
     char VER[] = "0.1.1";
     int opt;
     opt = getopt(argc, argv, "vf:");
     char *filename;

      while (opt != -1) {
           switch(opt) {
            case 'v':
                printf("version is %s", VER);
                break;
            case 'f':
                filename = optarg;
                break;
            }
     }
    printf("The filename was %s", filename);
    return 0;
}

I compile the code with:

$ gcc prog.c -o prog -Wall -Wextra

I can't seem to understand when I run it with -v option it never stops printing the version and with -f filename it stops there and never prints the filename I entered.

share|improve this question
    
Does that even compile? What's the "vf" in the signature of main? –  Carl Norum Sep 1 '13 at 3:09
    
Assuming that you read all the text in my question, yes it compiles otherwise i wouldn't ask about problems that occur when i run the program. v and f are the options available (-v and -f). The : after f means that -f wants one more parameter from the user. –  yaku Sep 1 '13 at 3:12
    
Well, since what you posted didn't compile, I think my question was reasonable. –  Carl Norum Sep 1 '13 at 3:22
    
Yes you are correct. And my vf part was also reasonable. –  yaku Sep 1 '13 at 3:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It doesn't stop because you only call getopt() once. A possible fix:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int
main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    char VER[] = "0.1.1";
    int opt;
    const char *filename = "unspecified";

    while ((opt = getopt(argc, argv, "vf:")) != -1)
    {
        switch (opt)
        {
            case 'v':
                printf("version is %s\n", VER);
                break;
            case 'f':
                filename = optarg;
                break;
            default:
                fprintf(stderr, "Usage: %s [-v][-f file]\n", argv[0]);
                return(1);
        }
    }
    printf("The filename was %s\n", filename);
    return 0;
}

Note that I've made sure that filename is initialized, that printf() outputs end with a newline, and that the error cases are reported.

Here's another, slightly more complex, example program:

/* Example 1 - using POSIX standard getopt() */

#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int
main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    int opt;
    int i;
    int bflag = 0;
    int aflag = 0;
    int errflag = 0;
    char *ifile = 0;
    char *ofile = 0;

    while ((opt = getopt(argc, argv, ":abf:o:")) != -1)
    {
        switch (opt)
        {
        case 'a':
            if (bflag)
                errflag++;
            else
                aflag++;
            break;
        case 'b':
            if (aflag)
                errflag++;
            else
                bflag++;
            break;
        case 'f':
            ifile = optarg;
            break;
        case 'o':
            ofile = optarg;
            break;
        case ':':   /* -f or -o without operand */
            fprintf(stderr, "Option -%c requires an operand\n", optopt);
            errflag++;
            break;
        case '?':
        default:
            fprintf(stderr, "Unrecognized option: -%c\n", optopt);
            errflag++;
            break;
        }
    }

    if (errflag)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Usage: %s [-a|-b][-f in][-o out] [file ...]\n", argv[0]);
        exit(2);
    }

    printf("Flags: a = %d, b = %d\n", aflag, bflag);
    if (ifile != 0)
        printf("Input: %s\n", ifile);
    if (ofile != 0)
        printf("Output: %s\n", ofile);
    printf("Argc = %d, OptInd = %d\n", argc, optind);
    for (i = optind; i < argc; i++)
        printf("File: %s\n", argv[i]);
    return(EXIT_SUCCESS);
}

It is based on an example from a Sun manual. The -a and -b options are mutually exclusive. It illustrates (the limitations of) POSIX getopt() with 'optional arguments' enabled (the leading : on the option string). It also prints out its inputs at the end.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes that works. Thank you –  yaku Sep 1 '13 at 3:24
    
Thanks Jonathan, your examples are really enlightening. –  yaku Sep 1 '13 at 3:33
    
@yaku add printf("The filename was %s\n", filename); statement in case 'f', and remove after while. because if you use option v then also will print filename as unspecified. –  Gangadhar Sep 1 '13 at 3:36
1  
Thanks, and I'm glad. That's one of a series of example programs collected and completed while I was writing a replacement for getopt(). So, it was a simple copy/paste to provide it. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 1 '13 at 3:37
1  
@Gangadhar: I'm not sure I completely understand. Printing the filename in the case 'f' option is certainly feasible, but whether it is correct depends on what you want to do if the user runs prog -f file1 -f file2 -v -- file3. The repeated -f will, in the existing code, take the last value (file2); if you print in the switch, you'll see both file1 and file2, but unless you process the file then, it could lead to confusion. Considering what to do about repeated options is important — you can allow it and process each file as you go, or save the names for later, or reject it. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 1 '13 at 3:41

Here:

case 'v':
    printf("version is %s", VER);
    break;

the break is breaking you out of the switch statement, not out of the while loop, so the while loop continues and you go on forever because opt never changes. You're missing some logic, here, you probably want to be calling getopt() again somewhere in the loop.

share|improve this answer
int main(int argc, *argv[], "vf")   


getopt.c:5:20: error: expected declaration specifiers or â...â before â*â token
getopt.c:5:28: error: expected declaration specifiers or â...â before string constant

this should be

int main(int argc, char *argv[] )     

modified code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
  {
     char VER[] = "0.1.1";
     int opt;
   opt = getopt(argc, argv, "vf:");
     char *filename;

      while (opt != -1) {
           switch(opt) {
            case 'v':
                printf("version is %s\n", VER);
                exit(0);
            case 'f':
             //   filename = optarg;
                 printf("The filename was %s\n", argv[2]);
                exit(0);


            }
     }
    return 0;
share|improve this answer
    
yes i'm sorry i bad-pasted my code, Please check again. –  yaku Sep 1 '13 at 3:18

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