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How to preventing inheritance in Objective-C?

I need to either prevent it, or issue a compiler warning referring to the projects documentation.

I came up with the following, which I am not sure if works in all scenarios.

main

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>
#import "Child.h"
int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{

    @autoreleasepool {
        Child *c = [[Child alloc] init];
    }

    return TRUE;
}

Parent Class

.h

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface Parent : NSObject

@end

.m

#import "Parent.h"

@implementation Parent

+ (id)allocWithZone:(NSZone *)zone {
    NSString *callingClass = NSStringFromClass([self class]);
    if ([callingClass compare:@"Parent"] != NSOrderedSame) {
        [NSException raise:@"Disallowed Inheritance." format:@"%@ tried to inherit Parent.", callingClass];
    }
    return [super allocWithZone:zone];
}

@end

Child Class

.h

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>
#import "Parent.h"

@interface Child : Parent

@end

.m

#import "Child.h"

@implementation Child

@end
share|improve this question
2  
What is your question? –  Codo Sep 1 '13 at 7:58
    
Why do you need to prevent inheritance? Is this some form of OCD? –  trojanfoe Sep 1 '13 at 8:00
1  
@trojanfoe Undesired inheritance reduces maintainability. I have updated the question. –  Pétur Sep 1 '13 at 8:10
1  
preventing the inheritance, use the @interface Child : NSObject instead. –  holex Sep 1 '13 at 8:20
1  
if he has the code that's fine. but he wants some sort of assert for this and I find it valid. UIKit does this with methods that need to call super or parameter asserts –  Daij-Djan Sep 1 '13 at 8:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

the general approach looks good to me but why the string compare? Going after the class's name doesn't seem clean

here's a variant that does it comparing the Class objects:

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface A : NSObject 
@end
@implementation A
+ (id)allocWithZone:(NSZone *)zone {
    Class cls = [A class];
    Class childCls = [self class];

    if (childCls!=cls) {
        [NSException raise:@"Disallowed Inheritance." format:@"%@ tried to inherit %@.", NSStringFromClass(childCls), NSStringFromClass(cls)];
    }
    return [super allocWithZone:zone];
}
    @end

@interface B : A
@end
@implementation B
@end

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    @autoreleasepool {
        A *a = [[A alloc] init];
        NSLog(@"%@",a);
        B *b = [[B alloc] init];
        NSLog(@"%@",b);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Looks good, thank you for your time. –  Pétur Sep 1 '13 at 8:55
    
Don't you need to use NSStringFromClass() in order to print the class names? –  trojanfoe Sep 1 '13 at 9:05
    
no [class description] prints the name -- at least it works right now –  Daij-Djan Sep 1 '13 at 9:36
    
looking it up and modifying the answer as needed –  Daij-Djan Sep 1 '13 at 9:38
    
guess I rely on an implementation detail here –  Daij-Djan Sep 1 '13 at 9:41

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