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Since TypeScript 0.9, you can set the exported value of an module directly using export =:

// client.ts 
class Client { 
    constructor(public name: string, public description: string) { } 
} 
export = Client; 

Is there a way to reference Client using a /// <reference ... />?

The following does not expose the Client class:

/// <reference path="./client.ts" />

class SomeClass {
    addClient(client: Client) { // Could not find symbol 'Client'
        ...
    }
}

I guess this is the expected behavior since I'm exporting a direct reference to the Client class, so the module is basically anonymous. But in the above class I'm not actually instantiating a new Client, so adding import Client = require('Client'); would let the AMD loader load client.js even though it would not be needed if addClient is never called.

So I was hoping for something like:

/// <reference path="./client.ts" export="Client" />

Where export would be the name to assign the module to.

share|improve this question
    
When you use export =, it is compiled to an AMD module. Then it is an "external" module, which you must use the import foo = require("bar"); syntax to import it. JavaScript (and so TypeScript) cannot detect whether Client is actually used, and so the require call will be file-level. If you want to have such flexibility, declare a Client interface in a .d.ts type definition file and then <reference> it. – Stephen Chung Sep 3 '13 at 5:34
    
Yeah I guess (aside from importing Client) this is the only option, thanks. – sroes Sep 3 '13 at 6:37

/// <reference ... / does not work when you have something exported at the file level (called external modules in typescript documentation)

Modify your code to be :

// client.ts 
class Client { 
    constructor(public name: string, public description: string) { } 
} 
// Remove this line export = Client; 

Further explanation: The only way to access items in a file after you export anything at the file root level, is via the import/require combination.

PS: I made a video about internal / external typescript modules : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KDrWLMUY0R0&hd=1

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I am using requirejs. By using export = I'm able to prevent anything being defined in the global scope. I noticed I provided a bad example where I created a new instance of Client, in this case it would actually need the import. I edited my question to provide a case where Client might not be needed. – sroes Sep 1 '13 at 11:39
1  
Oh and btw, I did watch 2 of your videos on YouTube on the subject. They did help me understand how TypeScript Modules work, thanks for that! – sroes Sep 1 '13 at 11:56
    
Thanks. Made my answer more explicit "The only way to access items in a file after you export anything at the file root level, is via the import/require combination". what you could do is move the class to a third file without an export, and use it from there – basarat Sep 1 '13 at 13:22
    
So the only way for me to assign Client to the parameter client, is to add an import? This would mean requirejs will always load Client when SomeClass is being loaded, even though this might not be necessary. – sroes Sep 1 '13 at 14:23
    
Yes. As an external module creates a namespace you can only import via require. – basarat Sep 1 '13 at 21:54

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