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This is driving me crazy! I've been trying to write a Ruby method to find all permutations, to solve Project Euler's problem 24. When I swap the elements of an array, they are swapped properly. But when I try to STORE this swapped array in a DIFFERENT array, this new array only remembers the latest copy of my swapped array! It won't remember the older version.

When I print out a during the loop, it shows all permutations properly. But when I print out perm (which I use to store all different permutations of a), it only shows 1 version of a repeated several times. How do I fix this?

a = [0, 1, 2, 3]
perms = []

p "a = #{a}"              # output: "a = [0, 1, 2, 3]"
perms << a                # add a to perms array
p "perms = #{perms}"      # output: "perms = [[0, 1, 2, 3]]"

a[0], a[1] = a[1], a[0]   # swap 1st 2 elements of a
p "a = #{a}"              # output: "a = [1, 0, 2, 3]"
perms << a                # add a to perms array
p "perms = #{perms}"      # "perms = [[1, 0, 2, 3], [1, 0, 2, 3]]"

a[1], a[2] = a[2], a[1]   # swap 2nd 2 elements of a
p "a = #{a}"              # "a = [1, 2, 0, 3]"
perms << a                # add a to perms array
p "perms = #{perms}"      # "perms = [[1, 2, 0, 3], [1, 2, 0, 3], [1, 2, 0, 3]]"

Thanks to Sawa below, both "dup" and "clone" methods solved my problem! Why doesn't my original way work? When would I use "dup" vs. "clone"? Please give me some code examples.

a[0], a[1] = a[1], a[0]   # swap 1st 2 elements of a
p "a = #{a}"              # output: "a = [1, 0, 2, 3]"
b = a.dup (or a.clone)
perms << b
p "perms = #{perms}"      # "perms = [[0, 1, 2, 3], [1, 0, 2, 3]]" *** it remembers!
a[1], a[2] = a[2], a[1]   # swap 2nd 2 elements of a
p "a = #{a}"              # "a = [1, 2, 0, 3]"
b = a.dup (or a.clone)
perms << b
p "perms = #{perms}"      # "perms = [[0, 1, 2, 3], [1, 0, 2, 3], [1, 2, 0, 3]]" 
share|improve this question

Variables in Ruby (with some exceptions, such as variables bound to integers) contain references to objects, not values. Here's an example from running "irb":

1.9.3p374 :021 > str1="hi"
 => "hi" 
1.9.3p374 :022 > str2=str1
 => "hi" 
1.9.3p374 :023 > str1.replace("world")
 => "world" 
1.9.3p374 :024 > str2
 => "world" 

You'll notice that once I replace the value for str1, str2's "value" changes as well. That's because it contains a reference to the str1 object. I know one difference between dup and clone has to do with the "freeze" method. If I had called str1.freeze, then it would prevent the object str1 references from being modified, e.g.,

1.9.3p374 :055 > str1.freeze
 => "hi" 
1.9.3p374 :056 > str1[0]="b"
RuntimeError: can't modify frozen String
    from (irb):56:in `[]='
    from (irb):56
    from /.rvm/rubies/ruby-1.9.3-p374/bin/irb:13:in `<main>

"Dup"-ing a frozen object doesn't create a frozen object whereas cloning does.

EDIT: just a slight update....When assigning an object on the right to a variable on the left (e.g., str = Object.new), the variable receives an object reference. When assigning one variable to another, the left-hand side variable receives a copy of the reference that the variable on the right contains. In either case, you are still storing object references in the left-hand side variable.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: Nicely explained – Borodin Sep 2 '13 at 13:26

Your original didn't work because you kept modifying the same array instance a.

Take a dup of the original array each time before you modify it into a different array. Or, create a new instance of Array by not relying on a destructive method.

a = original_array

b = a.dup
... # do some modifications to `b`
perms << b

c = a.dup
... # do some modifications to `c`
perms << c

...
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! Would you give me code examples please? Also, why doesn't my way work? Does it have to do with the perm array using pointers to point to the current value of array a only? Also, how about using "clone" vs. "dup"? – Raymond Gan Sep 1 '13 at 11:25
    
Aha! Both dup and clone solve my problem, though I don't know why/when we'd use one vs. another. This was interesting though: Ruby: the differences between dup & clone – Raymond Gan Sep 1 '13 at 11:41
    
Good that you were able to fix the problem. Usually, you can use dup. I rarely use clone. – sawa Sep 1 '13 at 11:45
    
Thank you. I don't even need a c. It still works if I keep reusing b, like I showed above. Why does my original code "modify the same array instance a"? Is it because of pointers going from perms to array a, regardless of what a is? Also, how would I "create a new instance of Array" for this problem? b = Array.new... what? – Raymond Gan Sep 1 '13 at 12:06

If you don't like reinventing the wheel, you can use the facets gem.

gem install facets

https://github.com/rubyworks/facets/blob/d96ec0d700d1d7180ccbb5452e0a926386ec0b32/lib/backport/facets/array/permutation.rb

require 'facets'

[1, 2, 3].permutation
#=> [[1, 2, 3], [1, 3, 2], [2, 1, 3], [2, 3, 1], [3, 1, 2], [3, 2, 1]]
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I already know that I may get all permutations of an array in Ruby with the built-in permutation method, like this: a.permutation.map(&:join), which gives an array of permuted strings. – Raymond Gan Sep 1 '13 at 11:57
    
a.permutation.map{|x| x} gives an array of permuted arrays, same as the output of 'facets'. – Raymond Gan Apr 18 '14 at 15:00

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