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I've searched a lot but I've found many complicated examples, too hard to understand for me. Anyways I'm trying to write down a regular expression that should honor:

/foo     // should match
/foo/bar // should match

/login     // shouldn't match
/admin     // shouldn't match
/admin/foo // shouldn't match
/files     // shouldn't match

I've tried with a simple one, just with one word: #^(\/)([^admin])# that is starting with / and followed by something not starting with the word admin. It's working with /foo/bar but fails with /a/foo because it's starting with a, I suppose.

How can negate an entire set of words (admin or files or login)?

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marked as duplicate by mario, ThiefMaster Sep 1 '13 at 12:08

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
What you are looking for is called "zero-width assertions" or "lookahead" and "lookbehind". regular-expressions.info/lookaround.html – ThiefMaster Sep 1 '13 at 12:06
    
@MichaelBerkowski I can't, the regex is for Symfony route matcher, accepting only regular expressions. – Polmonino Sep 1 '13 at 12:08
1  
@Polmonino You should edit that info into to the question above. – Michael Berkowski Sep 1 '13 at 12:09
    
well thanks..... – angry_kiwi Feb 5 '15 at 4:32

Try this:

$pattern = '#^(\/)((?!admin|login).)*$#';

or

$pattern = '#^(/)((?!admin|login).)(/(.)+)*#';
$array = array(
'/foo',     // should match
'/foo/bar', // should match

'/login',     // shouldn't match
'/admin',     // shouldn't match
'/admin/foo', // shouldn't match
'/files'     // shouldn't match
);

foreach($array as $test){
 if(preg_match($pattern, $test)) echo "Matched :".$test."<br>";
 else echo "Not Matched:".$test."<br>";
}

Output:

Matched :/foo
Matched :/foo/bar
Not Matched:/login
Not Matched:/admin
Not Matched:/admin/foo
Matched :/files
share|improve this answer
    
Why you added the end of the string? – Polmonino Sep 1 '13 at 12:17
    
Doesn’t match /not-admin either. – Gumbo Sep 1 '13 at 12:19
    
@Polmonino: I removed but the dot matches all after first group – user1646111 Sep 1 '13 at 12:20
    
@Gumbo: OP asked for /admin and /login – user1646111 Sep 1 '13 at 12:20
    
@Akam So it should match /no-admin, right? – Gumbo Sep 1 '13 at 12:21

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