Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there any built-in function in Go for copying one array to another? Will this work in case of two (or more) dimensional arrays?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Is there any built-in function in Go language for copying one array to another?

Yes: http://play.golang.org/p/_lYNw9SXN5

a := []string{
    "hello",
    "world",
}
b := []string{
    "goodbye",
    "world",
}

copy(a, b)

// a == []string{"goodbye", "world"}

Will this work in case of two (or more) dimensional arrays?

copy will do a shallow copy of the rows: http://play.golang.org/p/0gPk6P1VWh

a := make([][]string, 10)

b := make([][]string, 10)
for i := range b {
    b[i] = make([]string, 10)
    for j := range b[i] {
        b[i][j] = strconv.Itoa(i + j)
    }
}

copy(a, b)

// a and b look the same

b[1] = []string{"some", "new", "data"}

// b's second row is different; a still looks the same

b[0][0] = "apple"

// now a looks different

I don't think there's a built-in for doing deep-copys of multi-dimensional arrays: you can do it manually like: http://play.golang.org/p/nlVJq-ehzC

a := make([][]string, 10)

b := make([][]string, 10)
for i := range b {
    b[i] = make([]string, 10)
    for j := range b[i] {
        b[i][j] = strconv.Itoa(i + j)
    }
}

// manual deep copy
for i := range b {
    a[i] = make([]string, len(b[i]))
    copy(a[i], b[i])
}

b[0][0] = "apple"

// a still looks the same

edit: As pointed out in the comments, I assumed by "copy an array" you meant "do a deep copy of a slice", as arrays can be deep-copied with the = operator as per jnml's answer (because arrays are value types): http://play.golang.org/p/8EuFqXnqPB

share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot. It helped –  ArtyMathJava Sep 1 '13 at 15:44
2  
You've answered the question: "Is there any built-in function in Go language for copying one slice to another?" Which might be what the OP actually wanted but you should explain the difference between arrays and slices. –  Nick Craig-Wood Sep 1 '13 at 16:31
add comment

The primary "function" for copying an array in Go is the assignment operator =, as it is the case for any other value of any other type.

package main

import "fmt"

func main() {
        var a, b [4]int
        a[2] = 42
        b = a
        fmt.Println(a, b)

        // 2D array
        var c, d [3][5]int
        c[1][2] = 314
        d = c
        fmt.Println(c)
        fmt.Println(d)
}

Playground


Output:

[0 0 42 0] [0 0 42 0]
[[0 0 0 0 0] [0 0 314 0 0] [0 0 0 0 0]]
[[0 0 0 0 0] [0 0 314 0 0] [0 0 0 0 0]]
share|improve this answer
    
Well, no. Arrays and slices are always pointers, so you don't copy anything here, but just assign the pointer of a to b (resp. c to d). –  Erik Aigner Nov 4 '13 at 11:13
    
@ErikAigner Assigning an array will copy the entire array, as if it was a struct. This is different than in C. To create an array pointer you must explicitly take the address using '&'. –  galaktor Feb 12 at 10:58
add comment

Use copy http://play.golang.org/p/t7P6IliMOK

a := []int{1, 2, 3}
var b [3]int

fmt.Println("A:", a)
fmt.Println("B:", b)

copy(b[:], a)

fmt.Println("A:", a)
fmt.Println("B2:", b)

b[1] = 9

fmt.Println("A:", a)
fmt.Println("B3:", b)

OUT:

A: [1 2 3]
B: [0 0 0]
A: [1 2 3]
B2: [1 2 3]
A: [1 2 3]
B3: [1 9 3]
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.