Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

So I have 2 data sets in R: table 1 and table 2.

These are 2 .CSV files, with the same first column name called Date. However most of the dates are different, but some are the same.

What I would like to do is match the cells in that Date column that are identical in both tables, and then from that row where that cell is contained, i would like to return the five rows before it and the five rows after it in 10 different tables. So each row goes to a different new output table.

Basically I would like to run a regression on each ith row table afterwards, with some other column in that table..

I was thinking using head() and tail() but i couldnt figure out the index part to where to start..

thank you. this is a simple example. when match row 3 in table 1 with row 1 in table 2, how would i go about taking the 3 rows in table 1 below that matched row.

>table 1
>Date      price1  price2  price3  
>11/02/13   4.4        4.22    4.12  
>11/04/13   4.23       4.09    4.10
>12/01/13   4.01       4.27    4.14
>12/02/13   4.1        4.23    4.16
>12/02/13   4.65       4.23    4.17
>11/01/13   4.4        4.22    4.12
>11/07/13   4.23       4.09    4.10
>12/09/13   4.01       4.27    4.14
>12/12/13   4.1        4.23    4.16
>12/15/13   4.65       4.23    4.17

>table 2
>Date      price1  price2  price3
>12/01/13   2.4        2.22    9.12
>08/04/13   4.23       7.09    6.10
>12/01/13   1.01       6.27    6.14
>12/08/13   6.1        3.23    4.16
>12/05/13   4.65       2.23    3.17
>11/02/13   4.4        4.22    4.12
>07/04/13   4.23       4.09    4.10
>09/01/13   4.01       4.27    4.14
>01/02/13   4.1        4.23    4.16
>11/05/13   4.65       4.23    4.17
share|improve this question
1  
Please check this: stackoverflow.com/questions/5963269/… – Ferdinand.kraft Sep 1 '13 at 16:37
    
ok. did it. and edited.thanks. – Rmything Sep 1 '13 at 16:56
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Using the example data you provided:

table1 <- read.table(header=TRUE,text="
Date      price1  price2  price3  
11/02/13   4.4        4.22    4.12  
11/04/13   4.23       4.09    4.10
12/01/13   4.01       4.27    4.14
12/02/13   4.1        4.23    4.16
12/02/13   4.65       4.23    4.17
11/01/13   4.4        4.22    4.12
11/07/13   4.23       4.09    4.10
12/09/13   4.01       4.27    4.14
12/12/13   4.1        4.23    4.16
12/15/13   4.65       4.23    4.17
")

table2 <- read.table(header=TRUE,text="
Date      price1  price2  price3
12/01/13   2.4        2.22    9.12
08/04/13   4.23       7.09    6.10
12/01/13   1.01       6.27    6.14
12/08/13   6.1        3.23    4.16
12/05/13   4.65       2.23    3.17
11/02/13   4.4        4.22    4.12
07/04/13   4.23       4.09    4.10
09/01/13   4.01       4.27    4.14
01/02/13   4.1        4.23    4.16
11/05/13   4.65       4.23    4.17
")

First save the dates that match like this:

mydates <- merge(table1, table2, by="Date")$Date

Now write a helper function to get some specified dates and its neighboring rows from a given table:

getneighbors <- function(table, x, neigh=5){
    r <- -neigh:neigh
    lines <- which(table[,1] %in% x)
    o <- outer(lines, r, `+`)
    a <- apply(o, 2, pmin, nrow(table))
    a <- apply(a, 2, pmax, 1)
    L <- lapply(seq(ncol(a)), function(j)table[a[,j],])
    names(L) <- gsub("-","_",paste0("Neigh",r))
    L
}

This functions creates a list of dataframes, where each dataframe has the neighboring matches of table in x (using the first column of table). The number of neighbors to get is specified with neigh, default 5 (up and below).

Note that neighbors calculated simply by adding or subtracting may lie at invalid row numbers, hence the calls to apply(..., pmin) and apply(..., pmax). We assume that neighbors at rows 0 or negative are in fact the first row, and neighbors at rows beyond the size of the table are to be substituted by the last row.

With that in mind, there will be some duplicates, especially with small sample data:

> getneighbors(table1, mydates)

$Neigh_5
        Date price1 price2 price3
1   11/02/13    4.4   4.22   4.12
1.1 11/02/13    4.4   4.22   4.12

$Neigh_4
        Date price1 price2 price3
1   11/02/13    4.4   4.22   4.12
1.1 11/02/13    4.4   4.22   4.12

$Neigh_3
        Date price1 price2 price3
1   11/02/13    4.4   4.22   4.12
1.1 11/02/13    4.4   4.22   4.12

$Neigh_2
        Date price1 price2 price3
1   11/02/13    4.4   4.22   4.12
1.1 11/02/13    4.4   4.22   4.12

$Neigh_1
      Date price1 price2 price3
1 11/02/13   4.40   4.22   4.12
2 11/04/13   4.23   4.09   4.10

$Neigh0
      Date price1 price2 price3
1 11/02/13   4.40   4.22   4.12
3 12/01/13   4.01   4.27   4.14

$Neigh1
      Date price1 price2 price3
2 11/04/13   4.23   4.09   4.10
4 12/02/13   4.10   4.23   4.16

$Neigh2
      Date price1 price2 price3
3 12/01/13   4.01   4.27   4.14
5 12/02/13   4.65   4.23   4.17

$Neigh3
      Date price1 price2 price3
4 12/02/13    4.1   4.23   4.16
6 11/01/13    4.4   4.22   4.12

$Neigh4
      Date price1 price2 price3
5 12/02/13   4.65   4.23   4.17
7 11/07/13   4.23   4.09   4.10

$Neigh5
      Date price1 price2 price3
6 11/01/13   4.40   4.22   4.12
8 12/09/13   4.01   4.27   4.14

The result is a list, where each element is named NeighX or Neigh_X, indicating neighboring rows X below or X above, respectivelly. There are 11 elements by default, if you want only 10, ignore Neigh0, which stands for the rows that match precisely the ones indicated.

You can save the result in a list object, say, L <- getneighbors(table1, mydates), and access each dataframe using L[["Neigh3"]].

share|improve this answer
    
thank you for your help! – Rmything Sep 1 '13 at 20:36
    
well how about returning only the 5th row? or 4th etc..? instead of the 5 above? only one selected one thanks – Rmything Sep 1 '13 at 21:43
    
@Rmything If you have a different question, please make a new post -- instead of unaccepting a valid answer. – Ferdinand.kraft Sep 1 '13 at 22:14
    
actually it is the question i asked, but he responded only to a part of it. But you re right for the effort he put into it, i shouldn't unaccept it! i just wasn't sure how to get that detail checked out.thanks for your comment. – Rmything Sep 1 '13 at 22:16
    
@Rmything, sorry I didn't notice you wanted the rows spread out in different tables. I'll edit the answer. One more question: what to do about duplicates? say you matched rows 1 and 3. Neighbors are 0:6 and 0:8? Not all tables will be full... – Ferdinand.kraft Sep 1 '13 at 22:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.