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I've barely used the C++ move feature, so I'm not confident what I am doing is correct. I would appreciate anyone looking over my code and pointing out any mistakes I've made.

The idea is to create a map of resources stored by key. The resources may be non-copyable and non-movable.

Also, does my class need a constructor and destructor definition?

Thanks.

#define TYPE(x) std::identity<decltype(x)>::type

namespace General
{
    template<class T>
    std::string ToString(const T& x)
    {
        std::ostringstream ss;
        ss << x;
        return ss.str();
    }
}

namespace General
{
    template<class T, class KEY = std::string>
    class ResourceManager
    {
    public:
        typedef T ResourceType;
        typedef KEY KeyType;

        void Load(const KeyType& key, std::unique_ptr<ResourceType>&& resource);
        const ResourceType& Read(const KeyType& key) const;
        ResourceType& Modify(const KeyType& key);
        void Unload(const KeyType& key);
        std::unique_ptr<ResourceType>&& Release(const KeyType& key);
        void UnloadAll();

    private:
        std::map<KeyType, std::unique_ptr<ResourceType>> data;
    };
}

template<class T, class KEY>
void General::ResourceManager<T, KEY>::Load(const KeyType& key, std::unique_ptr<ResourceType>&& resource)
{
    auto find_it = data.lower_bound(key);
    if (find_it != data.end() && ! (data.key_comp()(key, find_it->first)))
    {
        throw std::runtime_error(General::ToString(key) + " already exists!");
    }
    else
    {
        data.insert(find_it, TYPE(data)::value_type(key, std::move(resource)));
    }
}

template<class T, class KEY>
const typename General::ResourceManager<T, KEY>::ResourceType& General::ResourceManager<T, KEY>::Read(const KeyType& key) const
{
    auto find_it = data.find(key);
    if (find_it == data.end())
    {
        throw std::runtime_error(General::ToString(key) + " could not be found!");
    }
    else
    {
        return *find_it->second;
    }
}

template<class T, class KEY>
typename General::ResourceManager<T, KEY>::ResourceType& General::ResourceManager<T, KEY>::Modify(const KeyType& key)
{
    auto find_it = data.find(key);
    if (find_it == data.end())
    {
        throw std::runtime_error(General::ToString(key) + " could not be found!");
    }
    else
    {
        return *find_it->second;
    }
}

template<class T, class KEY>
void General::ResourceManager<T, KEY>::Unload(const KeyType& key)
{
    auto find_it = data.find(key);
    if (find_it == data.end())
    {
        throw std::runtime_error(General::ToString(key) + " could not be found!");
    }
    else
    {
        data.erase(find_it);
    }
}

template<class T, class KEY>
std::unique_ptr<typename General::ResourceManager<T, KEY>::ResourceType>&& General::ResourceManager<T, KEY>::Release(const KeyType& key)
{
    auto find_it = data.find(key);
    if (find_it == data.end())
    {
        throw std::runtime_error(General::ToString(key) + " could not be found!");
    }
    else
    {
        auto resource = std::move(find_it->second);
        data.erase(find_it);
        return std::move(resource);
    }
}

template<class T, class KEY>
void General::ResourceManager<T, KEY>::UnloadAll()
{
    data.clear();
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's a simplified piece of code that demonstrates the crux of your situation and how to write the code idiomatically:

std::map<int, std::unique_ptr<Foo>> m;

void add_to_map(int key, std::unique_ptr<Foo> val)
{
    m[key] = std::move(val);
}

Usage:

add_to_map(1, std::unique_ptr<Foo>(new Foo(1, 2, 3)));

std::unique_ptr<Foo> p(new Foo(true, 'x'));
p->mutate();
add_to_map(std::move(p));

Basically, pass the unique pointer (or any other movable-only type, for that matter) by value and move from it.


One special situation I've encountered is when you want to take ownership of an object conditionally. In that case, pass the unique pointer by reference and inspect it afterwards:

void add_maybe(std::unique_ptr<Foo> & val)
{
    if (rand() % 2 == 0)
    {
        m[12] = std::move(val);
    }
}

Usage:

std::unique_ptr<Foo> p(new Foo(true, 'x'));

add_maybe(p);

if (p) { /* we still own the resource            */ }
else   { /* the resource is now owned by the map */ }

Update: To release an object from the map, return by value:

std::unique_ptr<Foo> release(int key)
{
    auto it = m.find(key);
    return it == m.end() ? { } : std::move(it->second);
}
share|improve this answer
    
So caller to the function should explicitly move his object to my value parameter? –  Neil Kirk Sep 1 '13 at 16:56
1  
@NeilKirk: If the caller has an lvalue, then yes. Otherwise it's implicit and no extra code is needed (as in the first usage example). And that example should be add_to_map(std::make_unique<Foo>(1,2,3)); really, though that requires C++14. –  Kerrek SB Sep 1 '13 at 16:57
    
What about the return type of the Release function? –  Neil Kirk Sep 1 '13 at 16:59
1  
Also by value, std::unique_ptr<ResourceType>. Basically, everything always by value, except for some exceptions. –  Kerrek SB Sep 1 '13 at 17:00

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