Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Why does this very simply piece of Python script not work?

I'm familar with Java so I thought I would give Python a go...but why does this not work?

def playAgain(roundCounter):
    reply = ""
    replyList='y n'.split()
    if roundCounter == 1:
        print('Would you like to play again? Y/N')
        while not reply in replyList:
            reply = input().lower  
        if reply == 'y':
            roundCounter == 1
        elif reply == 'n':
            print('Thanks for playing! Bye!')
            sys.exit()  

This should print "Would you like to play again?" and then keep requesting the users input until they type 'Y' or 'N'.

For some reason, it keeps looping over and over again though and won't break out of the loop - even if I type 'y' or 'n'.

It's such a simple piece of code I don't understand why it doesn't work - and in fact I used a near identical piece of code earlier on in my script and it worked fine!

share|improve this question
    
Could you share the near identical piece of code? It would probably be easier to find the problem by spotting differences between the two. – Samy Bencherif Sep 1 '13 at 16:56
1  
This isn't related to the problem (which is solved in the answers), but to help the Java => Python transition a bit: You're doing too much work with replyList='y n'.split(). There's Python syntax to define a list (replyList = ['y', 'n']) which is cleaner. In case you do want a string (maybe it will be a parameter to the function), you can test for membership in a string just as in a list. So reply_opts = 'yn' and then 'y' in reply_opts will evaluate to True. – mwaskom Sep 1 '13 at 17:10

you forgot the parantheses:

reply = input().lower  # this returns a function instead of calling it

do this:

reply = input().lower()

Edit: As pointed by arshajii, you're also doing the assignment wrong:

if reply == 'y':
    roundCounter == 1  # change this to: roundCounter = 1

== is the equality operator and returns a boolean, assignment is done by =

share|improve this answer
2  
This seems to be a bigger issue than the ==, but you might want to add that to your answer as well for the sake of completeness (I deleted mine). – arshajii Sep 1 '13 at 16:58
    
Grrrr its always the small things! Thank you! (You too arshajii for spotting my other mistake!) – DeaIss Sep 1 '13 at 16:59
2  
@arshajii, Yes, note that roundCounter is already 1 anyway, so the whole if reply == 'y' is unnecessary. – Paulo Almeida Sep 1 '13 at 17:00
    
Indeed - usually roundCounter is 6, but for the sake of testing my code I reduced it to 1! – DeaIss Sep 1 '13 at 17:02
import sys

def playAgain(roundCounter):
    reply = ""
    replyList='y n'.split()
    if roundCounter == 1:
        print('Would you like to play again? Y/N')
    while not reply in replyList:
        reply = input().lower()
    if reply == 'y':
        roundCounter = 1
    elif reply == 'n':
        print('Thanks for playing! Bye!')
        sys.exit()

playAgain(1)
share|improve this answer
1  
As the asker of this question pointed out, he wants it to loop if the reply is not 'y' or 'n'. So your idea of moving the if and elif statements inside the while loop makes no sense. He only wants to check those conditions if the replies are actually in the replyList. They are perfectly fine left outside the while loop. Arsh Singh's answer to this question covers everything. – Shashank Sep 1 '13 at 17:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.