Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

This regex is supposed to find a string that finds something in this format exactly:

201308 - (82608) - MAC 2233-007-Methods of Calculus - Lastname, Lee.txt

The only caveat is the last part between the last hyphen and the .txt, and the course name right before that, can both be a variable number of letters (the instructor name and course name). All else has that number of characters in that format (either int numbers separated exactly by that many spaces and hyphens or that exact course prefix with all cap letters).

What the regex is actually doing is finding nothing at all. Without trying to escape the parentheses it was catching some files, but now nada. I'm using re.search instead of re.match because obviously the regex is not finished and I'm testing pieces of it.

import re, os, sys, shutil

def readDir(path1):
    return [ f for f in os.listdir(path1) if os.path.isfile(os.path.join(path1,f)) ]

def files(dir1,term,path1):
    match2 = []; stillWrong = []#; term = str(term)
    for f in dir1:
        result = re.search(term + "\s\b\s\(\d{5}\)\s\b\s\w{3}\s\d{4}\b\d{3}[a-z\A-Z]+\s\b\s[A-z\a-z]+\b\s[A-Z\a-z]+ .txt",f)
        if result: match2.append(f)
        else: stillWrong.append(f)
        #print "split --- ",os.path.split(f)
        ##else: os.rename(path1+'\\'+f, path1+'\\'+'@ '+f); stillWrong.append(f)
        print "f ---- ",f
    return match2, stillWrong

term = "201308"; src = "testdir1"; dest = "testdir2"

print files(readDir(dest),term,dest)

This produces the (obviously) wrong:

    >>> 
f ----  @ @ @ @ @ @ 123 abc - a-1 - b-2.txt
f ----  @ @ @ @ @ @ 201308 - (82608) - MAC 2233-007-Methods of Calculus - Klingler, Lee.txt
f ----  @ @ @ @ @ @ 201308 abc 123.txt
f ----  @ @ @ @ @ @ 201308-(12345) - Abc 2233-007-course Name - last, first.txt
f ----  @ @ @ @ @ @ 45-12 - xyz - mno - 123-pqr-tuv-456.txt
f ----  @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ 201308 - (82608) - MAC 2233-007-Methods of Calculus - Klingler, Lee.txt
f ----  @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ 201308 abc 123.txt
f ----  @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ 201308-(12345) - Abc 2233-007-course Name - last, first.txt
f ----  @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ 123 abc - a-1 - b-2.txt
f ----  @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ 45-12 - xyz - mno - 123-pqr-tuv-456.txt
f ----  @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 123 abc - a-1 - b-2.txt
f ----  @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 45-12 - xyz - mno - 123-pqr-tuv-456.txt
([], ['@ @ @ @ @ @ 123 abc - a-1 - b-2.txt', '@ @ @ @ @ @ 201308 - (82608) - MAC 2233-007-Methods of Calculus - Klingler, Lee.txt', '@ @ @ @ @ @ 201308 abc 123.txt', '@ @ @ @ @ @ 201308-(12345) - Abc 2233-007-course Name - last, first.txt', '@ @ @ @ @ @ 45-12 - xyz - mno - 123-pqr-tuv-456.txt', '@ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ 201308 - (82608) - MAC 2233-007-Methods of Calculus - Klingler, Lee.txt', '@ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ 201308 abc 123.txt', '@ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ 201308-(12345) - Abc 2233-007-course Name - last, first.txt', '@ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ 123 abc - a-1 - b-2.txt', '@ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ 45-12 - xyz - mno - 123-pqr-tuv-456.txt', '@ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 123 abc - a-1 - b-2.txt', '@ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 45-12 - xyz - mno - 123-pqr-tuv-456.txt'])
>>> 

As you can see there's nothing in match2[] list (if you're interested, those are the filenames in the 2nd list, but the 1st list holds the relevant matches). I'm teaching myself Python and regex, and it's not going well. I've tried these (and regex tutorials) but didn't seem helpful in this case:

Escaping regex string in Python

Regex to escape the parentheses

How to implement \p{L} in python regex

All of the @ are from the os.rename that you see commented out, but it didn't work before that was commented anyhow. I'm sure any entry-level programmer could top this off in a few minutes, but if a pro happens on this question and would spare a minute, that's great too.

EDIT: List of filenames used (production list is much longer obviously):

201308-(12345) - Abc 2233-007-course Name - last, first.txt
201308 - (82608) - MAC 2233-007-Methods of Calculus - Klingler, Lee.txt
@ @ @ @ @ @ 201308 abc 123.txt
@ @ @ @ @ @ 123 abc - a-1 - b-2.txt
@ @ @ @ @ @ 45-12 - xyz - mno - 123-pqr-tuv-456.txt
@ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ 201308-(12345) - Abc 2233-007-course Name - last, first.txt
@ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ 201308 abc 123.txt
@ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ 201308 - (82608) - MAC 2233-007-Methods of Calculus - Klingler, Lee.txt
@ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ 123 abc - a-1 - b-2.txt
@ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ 45-12 - xyz - mno - 123-pqr-tuv-456.txt
@ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 123 abc - a-1 - b-2.txt
@ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 45-12 - xyz - mno - 123-pqr-tuv-456.txt
45-12 - xyz - mno - 123-pqr-tuv-456.txt
123 abc - a-1 - b-2.txt
201308 - (82608) - MAC 2233-007-Methods of Calculus - Klingler, Lee.txt
201308 abc 123.txt
201308-(12345) - Abc 2233-007-course Name - last, first.txt
share|improve this question
1  
. has a special meaning in regex, you should escape it: \.txt. – Ashwini Chaudhary Sep 1 '13 at 18:13
    
Didn't affect the regex results but thanks I'll keep that mind anyhow. – stackuser Sep 1 '13 at 18:21
1  
You're not considering the -'s in your regex, and [A-z\a-z] should be [a-zA-Z].\b is used for word boundary. , in Klingler, is also not matched anywhere. – Ashwini Chaudhary Sep 1 '13 at 18:22
    
Thanks for clearing up my confusion on how to get either upper or lower case. – stackuser Sep 1 '13 at 18:27
up vote 1 down vote accepted

\d{6}\s-\s\(\d{5}\)\s-\s\w{3}\s\d{4}-\d{3}-[^\.]+\.txt matches the string you sent in as an example. If the initial value is unknown, term + '\s-\s\(\d{5}\)\s-\s\w{3}\s\d{4}-\d{3}-[^\.]+\.txt' should do it (provided term plays nice for the regex).

adding a test run sample:

>>> term = '201308'
>>> f = '201308 - (82608) - MAC 2233-007-Methods of Calculus - Klingler, Lee.txt'
>>> re.search(term + '\s-\s\(\d{5}\)\s-\s\w{3}\s\d{4}-\d{3}-[^\.]+\.txt', f).group(0)
'201308 - (82608) - MAC 2233-007-Methods of Calculus - Klingler, Lee.txt'

yet another:

>>> f = '/somefolder/somefolder2/201308 - (82608) - MAC 2233-007-Methods of Calculus - Klingler, Lee.txt'
>>> re.search(term + '\s-\s\(\d{5}\)\s-\s\w{3}\s\d{4}-\d{3}-[^\.]+\.txt', f).group(0)
'201308 - (82608) - MAC 2233-007-Methods of Calculus - Klingler, Lee.txt'

>>> f = 'c:\\somefolder\\somefolder2\\201308 - (82608) - MAC 2233-007-Methods of Calculus - Klingler, Lee.txt'
>>> re.search(term + '\s-\s\(\d{5}\)\s-\s\w{3}\s\d{4}-\d{3}-[^\.]+\.txt', f).group(0)
'201308 - (82608) - MAC 2233-007-Methods of Calculus - Klingler, Lee.txt'
share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately match2[] is still empty and stillWrong[] is totally full. But that clears up some confusion I was having about where to place the hyphens and whether to use \b and few other things. But still not working, sorry. – stackuser Sep 1 '13 at 18:33
    
Add a list of file names so that a proper test can be run – leon Sep 1 '13 at 18:35
    
Yes, you're right the problem is not in your regex. That's what I need and what I needed to learn as well. – stackuser Sep 1 '13 at 18:53

Some things seem very strange for me:

  • \s\b\s is aberrant because \b means "Matches the empty string, but only at the beginning or end of a word`" but here it's between two symbols meaning whitespace, that is to say not at beginning or end of a word.

  • the antislash in [A-z\a-z] provokes an error. I wonder what it's supposed to mean here. Do you want an antislash as a possible character of the sett ? then write [A-z\\\\a-z]

This regex matches your example string:

r = re.compile(term +
               ("\s-\s"
                "\(\d{5}\)"
                "\s-\s"
                "\w{3}\s\d{4}-\d{3}-"
                "[a-zA-Z ]+"
                "\s-\s"
                "[A-za-z]+,\s"
                "[A-Za-z]+ *.txt"))
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry for any confusion I caused with the antislash, that was my own misunderstanding of what I should have doing in the regex. Yours is a beautiful regex, it's just that someone answered earlier in time than you, but if I could accept 2 answers then yours would be it. And I can clearly see a lot of what I was doing wrong, by looking at how you corrected. – stackuser Sep 1 '13 at 18:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.