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I have a problem using std::unique_ptr with deleter in C++. Here is how the code looks like :

std::unique_ptr<SDL_Surface> srf( SDL_CreateWindow(...), SDL_DestroyWindow );

This is how the code looks like. Below is the error VS express throws.

Error   1   error C2664: 'std::unique_ptr<_Ty>::unique_ptr(SDL_Surface *,const std::default_delete<_Ty> &) throw()' : cannot convert parameter 2 from 'void (__cdecl *)(SDL_Window *)' to 'const std::default_delete<_Ty> &'

Please post how can I get this working with explanation, thanks.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Type of the deleter is a part of the unique_ptr's type and must be specified as a template argument:

std::unique_ptr<SDL_Surface, decltype(SDL_DestroyWindow)*>
    srf(SDL_CreateWindow(...), SDL_DestroyWindow);

By default it's a std::default_delete, and a pointer to SDL_DestroyWindow is not convertible to it.

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alternatively, decltype(&SDL_DestroyWindow) –  nurettin Nov 13 '13 at 22:23

You could specialize std::default_delete for your type:

namespace std {
  template<>
  struct default_delete<SDL_Window> {
    void operator()(SDL_Window* ptr) const {
      SDL_DestroyWindow(ptr);
    }
  };
}

Then you can construct the std::unique_ptr<SDL_Window> without specifying the deleter explicitely:

std::unique_ptr<SDL_Window> sfr(SDL_CreateWindow(...));

However, you should be aware that if you forget to include the specialization in your code, the SDL_Window will be deleted with the unspecialized std::default_delete, which just deletes the pointer.

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Thanks for answer, but because I use smart pointers for different objects this could get pretty long. Good to know there is another way to do things though. –  user2715488 Sep 3 '13 at 11:37
    
Why would this be a problem? You only have to specialize default_delete once per type you want to use. After that, the actual definitions of the std::unique_ptrs are as short as they can get (and you don't have to look up the correct deleting function each time). –  reima Sep 3 '13 at 12:33

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