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I am working on a program in C as a part of Homework in which I have to get the product of two long numbers which are taken as character string. eg: 123456789021 and 132456789098. Since it is taken as a string, I converted them to long long int for the multiplication. But the resulting product will be very large(larger than long long int I guess). Can anyone please suggest me a method to perform this multiplication?

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6 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Here's one approach: Consider how you would multiply these numbers by hand, on paper. Implement this method in C. You will have to discover:

  • how to break up an integer (represented as a string) into digits
  • how to convert each digit back to an integer 0 <= d < 10
  • how to manage arrays of digits (ie. how big should you make the arrays?)
  • how to write the loop(s) you might need to implement multiplication
  • how to manage carrying products from one digit to the next
  • how to convert those digits back to characters for output
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2  
And if it weren't for the fact that your input and output were in base 10, you could do all this more efficiently by using base 2^32 (digits held in a 64 bit type) or base 2^16 (in a 32 bit type) instead of base 10. –  Steve Jessop Dec 6 '09 at 23:10
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usually big integers represented as byte arrays. You can look at Microsoft's BigInteger implementation in DLR. I think they've used algorithms developed by Knuth

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Check this BigInteger library and a very basic sample code from World of Seven.

If you are interested in some of my home cooked codes in C (only multiplication) :

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Code removed after I checked the home-work tag ;)

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

This works in some of the earlier programming contests I had participated ;)But if you are looking for even faster multiplication algorithm you can Implement Karatsuba algorithm,I personally use this now in real time contest.

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Hey man,check this out,i just completed it yester day as a part of my homework:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>

int main()
{
    char one[195];
    char two[195];
    char temp[195];
    int a[195],c[195],b[195];
    int x,i,j,k,l,p,add;

    for(;;)/*determining the larger number...*/
    {
        printf("Input A:");
            gets(one);
        printf("Input B:");
            gets(two);

        k=strlen(one);
        l=strlen(two);
        if(l>k)
        {
            strcpy(temp,one);
            strcpy(one,two);
            strcpy(two,temp);
            break;
        }
        else
        {
            break;
        }
    }
        k=strlen(one);
        l=strlen(two);
    for(p=0;p<195;p++)/*assigning all initial values to 0*/
    {
        a[p]=0;
        b[p]=0;
        c[p]=0;
    }

    for(i=0;one[i];i++)/*converting char to integer(note:1,as a character assigned as 49.)*/
    {
        a[i]=((one[--k])-48);
    }

    for(i=0;i<two[i];i++)
    {
        b[i]=((two[--l])-48);
    }


    for(i=0;i<=strlen(two);i++)/*main algorithm*/
    {
        add=0;
        p=0;
        for(j=i;j<=(2*strlen(one)-1);j++)
        {
            x=c[j]+b[i]*a[p]+add;
            c[j]=x%10;
            add=x/10;
            p++;
        }
    }

    printf("\nMultiplication:");
    for(p=(2*strlen(one)-1);p>=0;p--)
    {
        if(p>strlen(one)&&c[p]==0)
        {
            continue;
        }
        printf("%d",c[p]);
    }
    printf("\n");
}
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You can use a library for large integer arithmetik, Wikipedia has a list here.

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3  
Although large number libraries are often helpful, I believe it would go against the thought and purpose behind the problem. –  Inisheer Dec 6 '09 at 19:24
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Another approach would be to multiply the numbers as float/double and stip off the decimal when displaying the results.

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You could potentially lose a lot of precision by doing this. –  Jay Conrod Dec 6 '09 at 19:34
    
That won't give an exact answer if there are too many digits though. It may be good enough depending on the use case, but I don't think that's the point of the assignment. –  Matthew Crumley Dec 6 '09 at 19:41
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