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I'm trying to implement a template for states machines in C++, but I'm not sure how to handle static object members. Each state machine would be defined by its state variables and its transitions (which are structs). For instance:

// stm.h

template <class T>
struct transition
{
    ... transition relevant data depending on state variables T ...
};

template <class T>
class stm
{
  T *stv; // state variables
  static struct transition<T> *transitions; // I would like to have only one copy of transitions for stm's of type T
  ... etc ...
};

Now, suppose I'm trying to implement the stm foo:

// foo_defs.h

struct foo_stv
{
  char a;
  int b;
};

// foo_transitions.h
// Note that I'm using a different file to keep everything in order

#include "stm.h"
#include "foo_defs.h"

struct transition<struct foo_stv> foo_transitions[] =
{
  { ... trans1 ... },
  ...,
  { ... transN ... }
};

// foo_stm.h

#include "stm.h"
#include "foo_defs.h"
#include "foo_transitions.h"

class foo_stm
{
  stm<struct foo_stv> stm;
  struct foo_stv stv;
  ... other data ...
};

Ok. So each instance of foo_stm should have a different set of state variables, but all instances should use the same transitions. The question is, how should I define/declare stm<struct foo_stv> in order to use foo_transitions as its class level transitions member?

Also any advice about C++ coding customs is welcome, since I come from the C coding world and just getting started with some C++ mechanics.

EDIT: Just to make clear my question, I guess you should forget about the stm logic and focus on the following: What's the correct way of doing something like...

foo_stm::stm.transitions = foo_transitions;
share|improve this question
    
why not a singleton pattern ? The problem will be that you can not initialize the static member except in the cpp, OR if you use recent c++. –  dzada Sep 1 '13 at 21:48
1  
"Also any advice about C++ coding customs is welcome, since I come from the C coding world and just getting started with some C++ mechanics" OK: struct keyword is not needed in C++ (Im talking about the sentences like stm<struct foo_stv>. The only difference between class and struct is that the default scope of class members is private, in struct is public. –  Manu343726 Sep 1 '13 at 22:11
    
"each instance of foo_stm should have a different set of state variables, but all instances should use the same transitions." How can you have different state variables and the same transitions? –  BartoszKP Sep 1 '13 at 23:24
    
@BartoszKP Because the transition struct is composed of call back functions that use as one of its arguments the state vars of the instance stm. –  user2553780 Sep 2 '13 at 2:44
    
@dzada Not sure if I could apply that to my particular problem, but I'll search info about it. Thanks. –  user2553780 Sep 2 '13 at 2:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

All right, I think that what you want to do is:

template <class T>
class stm
{
  T *stv;
  static transition<T> *transitions;
};

template<class T>
transition<T>* stm<T>::transitions; //define static template member

And then:

//define static member for particular template instantiation
template<>
transition<foo_stv>* stm<foo_stv>::transitions = foo_transitions;

class foo_stm
{
  stm<struct foo_stv> stm;
  struct foo_stv stv;
  ... other data ...
};
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting, I'll try this when I get home. I'm trying to desing in the context of OOP, but not used to it. Where am I failing? –  user2553780 Sep 3 '13 at 14:39
1  
I'll try to give you a more detailed answer soon, sorry for the delay. –  BartoszKP Sep 4 '13 at 21:20
1  
All right, I've analysed your solution more thoroughly and I think it's quite OK, in the context template programming. What I saw wrong the last time, was the fact that you're abusing a bit the "struct" keyword (C-style), and it blurred my vision a bit :-) Assuming that your transition structure contains a pair of states, and optionally some additional transition data all seems to be OK. Sorry for the misleading comment in my previous answer. –  BartoszKP Sep 11 '13 at 22:26

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