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I'm following a tutorial to create a text adventure, I'm now creating the sections, still not done, but there's something I just don't understand. So, I'm creating an array for the sections. The array includes description and the name. Now the name of the section has a code that lowers it, replaces spaces with -'s. And it deletes periods and apostrophes. And then puts it in an array called sec. This is the part of it which I don't understand:

sec = {}
for indexed in enumerate(sections):
    index = indexed[0]
    long_name = indexed[1][1]
    short_name = ''
    for C in long_name:
        if C == ' /':
            short_name += '-'
        elif not C == ".'":
            short_name += C.lower()
    sec[short_name] = index

And this is my whole code:

    import time
import random
sections = [
    (
        """You are in front of your friend's house. Your friend's house is
(n)orth and the driveway is south. There is a mailbox next to you.""",
        "Front Of Friend's House"), #0
    (
        """You are in your friend's house. Northwest is the stairs, the
kitchen is up north, the door is south. Your friend is upstairs.""",
        "Friend's house"), #1
    (
        """You are upstairs, the bathroom is up north, your friend's bedroom
is west. The stair down is south.""",
        "Friend's house upstairs"), #2
    ]

sec = {}
for indexed in enumerate(sections):
    index = indexed[0]
    long_name = indexed[1][1]
    short_name = ''
    for C in long_name:
        if C == ' /':
            short_name += '-'
        elif not C == ".'":
            short_name += C.lower()
    sec[short_name] = index

Can somebody explain the part to me of which I don't understand, I don't like writing something without knowing what I'm doing. I also don't know what for means. And how C can be used without it being defined or something. If you could explain this to me that would be great!

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closed as off-topic by Charles Duffy, Chris Laplante, falsetru, Mayank, talonmies Sep 2 '13 at 5:19

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – Chris Laplante, falsetru, Mayank
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
I assume you've looked it up in the documentation? Which part of it is unclear? –  Juhana Sep 1 '13 at 21:36
    
for is a loop. The body is executed multiple times, once for each element of long_name. On each execution of the body, the variable C is set equal to the current element. However, the code is incorrect. long_name is a string, its elements are 1 character long, so will never be equal to ' /' or to ".'" which are both 2 characters long. It's possible you meant to write if C in ' /': instead. –  Steve Jessop Sep 1 '13 at 21:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I made the code slightly clearer, in the enumerate section. enumerate allows iteration over pairs of iteration number, iteration item, so you might as well assign the variables separately. I suggest experimenting with straightforward iteration (for directionpair in sections:) and enumeration (for index,directionpair in enumerate(sections)) to see the difference.

From reading your description, you should be using the keyword in to check whether C is in the string "'." or "\ ", as no character could ever be equal to a two-character string.

sec = {} #construct a dictionary
for index, directionpair in enumerate(sections):
    long_name = directionpair[1] #take the second element of the pair
    short_name = ''
    for C in long_name: #for each character in long_name
        if C in ' /': #every time you find a forward slash in long_name, write '-' in short-name instead
            short_name += '-'
        elif C not in "'." : #in short-string, add all lower-case versions of the character if it's not a '.'
            short_name += C.lower()
    sec[short_name] = index

Note that this could have been done more easily with the correct functions, and actually even the expression below could be improved with re.sub:

sec = {} #construct a dictionary
for index, directionpair in enumerate(sections):
    long_name = directionpair[1] #take the second element of the pair
    short_name = long_name.replace('/','-').replace(' ','-').replace("'",'').replace('.','').lower()
    sec[short_name] = index
share|improve this answer
    
You could also do for index, (_, long_name) in enumerate(sections):. _ (perhaps surprisingly) is a valid Python variable name, traditionally used when you're ignoring part of an unpacked tuple. In this case, the first value in each section is unused. –  Steve Jessop Sep 1 '13 at 21:56
    
Very true...you could even do it as a one-line function, e.g. sec={ln.replace('/','-').replace('.','').lower():ind for(ind,(_,ln)) in enumerate(sections)} –  user1470788 Sep 1 '13 at 22:02
    
What does long_name = directionpair[1] do? And for index, directionpair? –  Stepepper Sep 1 '13 at 22:14
    
You are iterating over sections, which is a list of pairs. The iteration assigns directionpair to each pair from sections in turn. directionpair[0] is the first element of the pair; directionpair[1] is the second element of the pair. –  user1470788 Sep 1 '13 at 22:17
    
If you want a better understanding of what iterators do, you can step through them like this: assign your iterator to a variable, e.g. iter=enumerate(sections). Then use iter.next() to see each output of the enumeration. –  user1470788 Sep 1 '13 at 22:22

Iterating over a string breaks it up into characters in Python. So

for C in 'foo':
    print C

will print

f
o
o
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Short answer which will become clear after you read the documentation of for statements in Python.

  1. indexed iterates through the elements of sections which are numbered from 0. E.g., in the first iteration, indexed is (0, ("""You are in front...""", "Front..."))

  2. long_name is the second element of the section, i.e., "Front...".

  3. C iterates through the characters of the long name which is converted to lowercase. There must be something wrong there, in the two comparisons of C against strings that are longer than a character.

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