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I've been trying to figure out how to associate my models on a project I've been working on for a while, and I've come here for help a couple times before, but I never got a satisfactory answer. I have two models: Post and Image. Every post has several images attached to it and posts can share images, so a HABTM relationship made sense for that, like this:

class Post < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_and_belongs_to_many :images
end

class Image < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_and_belongs_to_many :posts
end

The problem now is that I want each post to have a single 'featured image.' How do I do this? The first thought that comes to mind is a simple has_one :featured_image on the post and belongs_to :post_featured_on on the image, but the problem with that is that the same image can be featured on multiple posts.

So the next idea I came up with is to reverse the relationship: belongs_to :featured_image on the post and has_many :posts_featured_on on the image. The problem with that is that it isn't very semantic and rails doesn't seem to want to let me set a post's featured image from its form, like this in the controller: Post.new(:featured_image => Image.find(params[:image_id]))

So the next idea suggested to me was a second HABTM relationship, like so: has_and_belongs_to_many :featured_images. There's an obvious problem with this, it's plural. I tried putting unique: true on the post_id column in the migration, but that didn't help the fact that I kept having to do this in my code: post.featured_images.first which can be very frustrating.

The last idea I tried was a has_many :posts, through: :attachment and has_one :featured_posts, through: :attachment in place of the original HABTM, but these just seems unnecessarily cumbersome, and rails doesn't seem to want to let me assign the images on the fly this way like Post.new(:featured_image => Image.find(params[:image_id])).

Is there any good way to do this? Have I done something wrong in my previous attempts? Shouldn't this just be a simple foreign key on the post table? Why does it have to be so difficult?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I like your second idea just fine. The full blown approach is to use a transaction model, such as @depa suggested. The transaction model is great when you want to store additional attributes such as when the Image was made featured for a given post (and perhaps when it was not, as well). But, whether you build that transaction object as well or not, you can just cache the featured image on the post object for quick access. Try just doing this:

class Post < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_and_belongs_to_many :images
  belongs_to :featured_image, class_name: 'Image'
end

class Image < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_and_belongs_to_many :posts
  # Purposefully not defining an inverse relationship back to Post.
  # You can if you need or want it but you may not.
end

Then, in the controller I'd recommend:

@post = Post.find_by_id(params[:id])
@post.featured_image = Image.find(params[:image_id])
@post.save

You probably didn't have success with this before because of not having attr_accessible :featured_image_id on the Post model. And/or because you were using the wrong attribute name. (It should have been Post.new(featured_image_id: Image.find(params[:image_id])).) Either way, it's good to keep the code a little more object-oriented than all that. The way I laid it out above, you don't have to think about the column name in the database, and can just think about the objects you're dealing with. I.e., just assign the Image to the Post's feature_image reference. Keeping this in mind, I prefer to not set foreign keys as attr_accessible when possible.

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I like this, but I hate having to fatten up the controller at all. By the way, I'm using Rails 4, so no attr_accessible. –  Dylan Karr Sep 1 '13 at 23:48
    
This is what I'm going with. –  Dylan Karr Sep 3 '13 at 0:34

You can do what you want using a has_one :through association.

class Post < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_and_belongs_to_many :images
  has_one                 :featured_image, 
                          :through => :feature,
                          :class_name => 'Image'
  has_one                 :feature
end

class Image < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_and_belongs_to_many :images
  has_many                :featured_images,
                          :through => :features,
                          :class_name => 'Image',
                          :foreign_key => :featured_image_id
  has_many                :features
end

class Feature < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to              :featured_image,
                          :class_name => 'Image'
  belongs_to              :post
end
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